Racial Preferences

How much longer will the Grutter racial preferences regime last?

Featured image The U.S. Supreme Court has before it a petition for certiorari in the race discrimination suit brought by Asian-American students against Harvard. I hope the Court agrees to hear the case. If the Court doesn’t, it will be a while before another opportunity arises to review the issue of race-based preferences in college admissions. By that time, the Court’s composition might not be as conservative as it is now. In »

Tangled up in Tulsa

Featured image President Biden traveled to Tulsa to deliver a speech on the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre. I can’t find an official White House version of the speech President Biden delivered in Tulsa yesterday. Rev has posted an unofficial transcript here. I have embedded the Guardian News video at the bottom. The speech mixed its memorial purpose with low Democratic politics while giving no hint of remarkable progress made »

How race preferences damage higher education

Featured image I want to second Steve’s praise for A Dubious Expediency: How Race Preferences Damage Higher Education, the fine new essay collection edited by Gail Heriot and Maimon Schwarzschild. The contributors include the two editors, Heather Mac Donald, Peter Kirsanow, and Peter Wood. Gail’s chapter on the impacts of race preferences on their intended direct beneficiaries is must reading, in my opinion. Wouldn’t it be great if the chapter were read »

Princeton drops Greek and Latin requirement for Classics majors

Featured image Using race-based preferences to admit students with qualifications vastly inferior to those admitted without the need for such preferences creates all sorts of problems and dislocations. One of them is the erosion of standards within various departments, especially ones that teach hard stuff. I wrote about one example — eliminating econometrics as a required course for graduating from a major school of public policy — here. Now comes word, via »

There must be a less embarrassing way to get into a top college

Featured image Stuffed animals seem to play an important part in the lives of a surprisingly large number of left-wing students. Apparently, they make these students feel safe. As safe as Play Doh does, maybe even safer. According to this report, a stuffed animal even helped a black teenager gain admission to Princeton: An inspiring essay about his childhood stuffed animal helped a New Jersey high school senior get into 20 colleges, »

Is Race Discrimination Illegal?

Featured image Most Americans naively believe that the 14th Amendment precludes our governments from discriminating on the basis of race. Sadly, that isn’t how the courts see it. Nevertheless, race discrimination is at least sometimes illegal, as a panel of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals held yesterday. The case relates to Joe Biden’s Restaurant Revitalization Fund, the terms of which are discriminatory. Hans Bader has the story: On Thursday, a federal »

Book of the Week: A Dubious Expediency

Featured image While we await word as to whether the Supreme Court will take up appeal of the case of Harvard’s blatant discrimination against Asians, we note the publication this week of A Dubious Expediency: How Race Preferences Damage Higher Education, a fine essay collection edited by Gail Heriot and Maimon Schwarzchild of the University of San Diego, and published by our friends at Encounter Books. The title of the book—”a dubious »

Why the Supreme Court should hear the Harvard case

Featured image We are writing with unfortunate frequency about the spread of the racial spoils system in the U.S. That system first took hold in college admissions policies. The Supreme Court could have stopped it in its tracks, but declined early on to do so. Since then, it has continued to tolerate blatant racial discrimination against Whites and Asian-Americans. Now, the Supreme Court has the opportunity to address the problem it helped »

Biden fuels racial divisions with Blacks-only debt relief for farmers

Featured image The dishing out of benefits based on skin color is becoming a huge issue in America. A practice that once seemed mostly confined to admission to college now extends as far as access to interviews with the mayor of Chicago. And, most significantly, it extends to the receipt of dollars from the federal government. Blacks say they are tired of being taken for granted by Democrat politicians. So Democrats are »

Two court defeats for racist policies

Featured image There are enough destructive and unlawful woke policies going forward these days to keep dozens, if not hundreds, of public interest law firms working full time. I’m happy to report on two recent court successes (for now) in cases challenging such policies. In Texas, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor has issued a temporary restraining order sought by a restaurant owner against the Biden Small Business Administration. The owner challenged the »

California scraps SAT and ACT tests. Is it legal?

Featured image In a move that will favor Black applicants for admission, the University of California has agreed to no longer consider SAT or ACT scores when making admissions and scholarship decisions. Most colleges and universities are confident they can discriminate against White and Asian applicants without ditching these tests. They believe they can, in effect, award free points (hundreds of them in the case of the SAT) to Black applicants to »

Math is Hard—Hardest of All for the Left

Featured image In recent weeks we’ve seen the announcement that certain Virginia public school districts (and others elsewhere in the country) will discontinue advanced math classes, because “equity,” and the University of California will permanently discontinue using the SAT for admission purposes. If you want to know why the left is doing this, have a close look at this chart: If there’s one thing the left can’t abide at the moment, it »

The war on standards, Rhodes Scholarship edition

Featured image Rhodes Scholarships have been awarded based, in part, on race for at least 50 years. A friend from high school, and one of the smartest people I’ve ever known, was up for the prize in 1971. In the late stage of the process, he was in a room with other candidates from his region. When a tall African-American, an athlete whom I also knew, entered, a buzz went through the »

Biden says Americans aren’t racist. Does he believe it?

Featured image Tim Scott’s powerful response to Joe Biden’s address to Congress has forced both Biden and Kamala Harris to reject a core belief of the BLM movement and the American left. Both the president and the vice president have now stated that the American people are not racist. Biden said this: No, I don’t think the American people are racist, but I think after 400 years, African-Americans have been left in »

Coca-Cola receives warning over its attempt to impose racial quotas

Featured image In March, I wrote about the demand by Coca-Cola’s then-general counsel that law firms representing the company engage in racial discrimination. In a letter to these firms, Coke demanded, among other things, that on Coca-Cola matters they “commit that at least 30% of each of billed associate and partner time will be from diverse attorneys, and of such amounts at least half will be from Black attorneys.” I argued that, »

A cry from the heart against rot in education

Featured image The Brearley School is a private all-girls school on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. It costs $54,000 a year to attend and, according to Bari Weiss, prospective families apparently have to take an “anti-racism pledge” to be considered for admission. Brearley’s supposed commitment to anti-racism does not prevent it from discriminating on the basis of race in admissions and hiring. Nor does it stop the school from indoctrinating its »

Princeton routs rest of Ivy League in diversity sweepstakes

Featured image Tech Gate USA has compiled a partial breakdown, by race, of the students offered admission by six of the eight Ivy League schools (all Ivies except Yale and Columbia). The breakdown is only partial because, with the exception of Harvard, the data released by the schools differentiate only between Whites and “persons of color” — an interesting fact, in itself. The Tech Gate numbers purport to encompass all accepted applicants, »