Senate

What price bipartisanship?

Featured image Yesterday, the Washington Post reported that the bipartisan infrastructure deal was in a “precarious state” because the Republicans who are a party to the negotiations were balking over details, particularly the idea of beefing up the IRS in order to raise revenue to help pay for the legislation. Today, Politico reports that the needed Republican votes probably aren’t there to agree to anything on Chuck Schumer’s timetable. Schumer has scheduled »

Compromise, GOP style, cont’d

Featured image Rich Lowry writes at some length urging Republicans abandon the infrastructure deal. He argues that Republicans “have nothing to gain by blessing a portion of President Joe Biden’s spending plans, when an ungodly amount of money is going to go out the door regardless of whether they vote for a chunk of it or not.” Yesterday I linked to and wrote about Marc Thiessen’s Washington Post column supporting the deal »

Compromise, GOP style

Featured image Marc Thiessen has written a good column on the alleged infrastructure compromise bill in process. The column appears in the Washington Post under the headline “Biden’s fake infrastructure ‘compromise’ has thrown Democrats into disarray.” AEI has posted Thiessen’s column in accessible form here. Thiessen describes what sounds like an illusory deal for the GOP: President Biden’s big gaffe was not his threat to veto a $1.2 trillion infrastructure deal he »

War on the suburbs, infrastructure style

Featured image If Republicans have signed off on the alleged infrastructure bill that is to be formulated as a “compromise” lopping off the ginormous tax and spending package Democrats intend to push through on their own, we should take a closer look at its contents. According to the March 31 White House Fact Sheet: The President’s plan invests $213 billion to produce, preserve, and retrofit more than two million affordable and sustainable »

Clean-up on WH aisle five

Featured image The editors of the Wall Street Journal seem to me to bring the necessary cynicism to explicating the infrastructure “compromise” that is to preface enactment of the related Dem wish list/prospective spending blowout: Mr. Biden’s statement Saturday changes nothing except the [White House counselor Steven] Ricchetti atmospherics. Mr. Biden spoke the real truth on Thursday. He knows, because Mr. Ricchetti tells him, that Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader »

Reconcile this

Featured image Politico Playbook cheers on the Democrats as it lets us know what “the deal” is. I take it from the Playbook report here this morning that it’s not a good deal. It’s a bad deal (emphases and links omitted in excerpt below): — Reconciliation. Despite Biden’s statement, the enormous reconciliation bill that Democrats are drafting will hang over the process all summer and remain a handy excuse [sic (and sickening)] »

Where is the love?

Featured image How is the GOP wing of the bipartisan infra dig infrastructure contingent taking their exposure as chumps on the morning after? Let’s go to this afternoon’s Politico Playbook PM for an update: This morning, we reported that Sen. LINDSEY GRAHAM (R-S.C.), one of the 11 Republicans who supported the bipartisan infrastructure framework, was backing out of the deal over President JOE BIDEN’S insistence that he would not sign the bipartisan »

The double-cross system

Featured image It’s hard to believe that a Senator as sophisticated as Rob Portman is a knowing participant in the double-cross system that has been presented to us under the rubric of a “bipartisan deal.” What’s the deal? The editors of the Wall Street Journal describe it bluntly as a “double cross” in their lead editorial (“Instant Bipartisan Double Cross”) this morning: Mr. Biden stood with five Democratic and five Republican Senators »

In a glass house with Sheldon Whitehouse

Featured image If the media pursued Democrats as it pursues Republicans, the odious Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island would be hounded from public life. The Washington Free Beacon’s Joe Simsonson follows up on a story that we have found of interest. Imagine this: Democratic lawmakers and racial justice advocates have kept quiet about Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse’s membership in a racially exclusionary organization, seemingly satisfied with the Rhode Island Democrat’s explanation »

Sheldon Whitehouse belongs to all-White beach club he promised to quit years ago

Featured image Sheldon Whitehouse is among the most obnoxious members of the Senate. He’s also among the most hypocritical. Whitehouse calls himself progressive and an opponent of “systemic racism.” Yet, the New York Post reports that the Rhode Island Senator has belonged for decades to an all-White beach club. I call that regressive. Whitehouse has confirmed the truth of this report. What’s his defense? He says “I think the people who are »

Senate senility

Featured image The Washington Post reports that the current U.S. Senate is the oldest in American history. Dianne Feinstein turns 88 this month. Charles Grassley turns 88 in September. Richard Shelby is 87. James Inhofe is 86. Patrick Leahy is 81. Twenty-three senators are in their 70s. The average age of senators at the beginning of this year was 64.3 years. It may be that being 88 now is like being, say, »

Senate Judiciary Committee splits 11-11 on Clarke nomination

Featured image This week, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted on two of Joe Biden’s nominees for top Justice Department jobs. The nominees are Todd Kim for Assistant Attorney General (AAG) for the Environment and Natural Resources Division and Kristen Clarke for AAG for the Civil Rights Division. The committee reported Kim out on a bipartisan basis. However, the vote on Clarke was 11-11, along strict party lines. Not surprisingly, no Republican member »

Senate confirms Vanita Gupta, 51-49

Featured image Last week, the Senate confirmed Vanita Gupta as Associate Attorney General, the number three position at the Department of Justice. Every Republican Senator except Lisa Murkowski, the Arlen Specter of the Klondike, voted against confirming Gupta. Had Gupta’s nomination been rejected, the post would very likely have been filled by someone equally radical. However, that nominee probably would have been less vicious and less dishonest than Gupta. That’s the downside »

The D.C. statehood gambit

Featured image Democrats seem intent on using the events of January 6 as a sort of Reichstag fire on which they can predicate a one-party state. They have H.R. 1. to federalize election law and facilitate fraudulent voting. They seek to pack the Supreme Court. And they propose turning the District of Columbia into a state. The D.C. statehood gambit has been around for a long time, but it answers to the »

Biden’s radical agenda likely to hit wall

Featured image Joe Biden, or whoever is pulling the strings, has an ambitious agenda. Too ambitious in a well-functioning democracy for a president who squeaked into the White House and whose party holds only half of the Senate seats. There is no mandate for the kind of sweeping change Biden and his handlers desire. One can debate whether ours is a well functioning democracy, but I hope it still functions well enough »

What To Watch Today

Featured image Two events are worth watching today—one a small detail that may morph into a significant detail, and the second a new angle on Gov. Cuomo’s mounting political troubles that may yet force his resignation or ouster from office. First, the Senate. Some time today—perhaps by the time this item goes live—the Senate will get a ruling from the Senate parliamentarian, Elizabeth MacDonough, on whether the $15 minimum wage proposal can »

Democrats play the race card on behalf of Tanden and Becerra [UPDATED: AOC chimes in]

Featured image One side benefit of the defeat of Neera Tanden’s nomination (if that’s what ends up happening) is the enjoyment of watching identity politics bean-counters explode in anger, making fools of themselves in the process. Rep. Judy Chu, head of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, and her colleague Rep. Grace Meng claim to detect a double standard in the opposition to Tanden (who is Asian, but not Asian Pacific, for »