Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

Iran’s trifecta

Featured image It’s no scoop to say that both Israel and Saudi Arabia are alarmed by President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. But it’s worth articulating the difference in the primary concern of the two. In doing so, we can better appreciate just how bad the deal is. Israel is unhappy with the deal because it all but ensures that Iran will obtain nuclear weapons. Whether Iran does so in 10 to »

The inside story of a Tennessee Islamist terrorist

Featured image I listened with disbelief last night as the media reported that investigators are searching for the motive behind the attack by Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez on two military centers in Tennessee. Surely, the deeds tell us the motive. Res ipsa loquitur, as lawyers say. The interesting question is how Adbulazeez came to harbor his terrorist motive. Who, if anyone, inspired him? Who, if anyone, directed him? We don’t know Abdulazeez’s story »

Kuwaiti born gunman kills four marines in Tennessee

Featured image Today, a gunman identified as Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez, who reportedly was born in Kuwait, killed four Marines at a Naval facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee. A few minutes earlier, Abdulazeez had opened fire at a nearby Armed Forces Career Center, but failed to kill anyone there. Abdulazeez died during the second attack. According to the Washington Post, it’s not yet clear whether he took his own life or was gunned down »

Why Obama’s best defense of his Iran deal falls short

Featured image John did an excellent job of dissecting President Obama’s efforts, during his press conference yesterday, to defend the Iran nuclear deal. However, Obama made one point that I consider substantial (perhaps because I raised in this post). Obama stated: So maybe [Iran’s mullahs] don’t get $100 billion dollars [if there is no deal]. Maybe they get $60 billion or $70 billion instead. The price for that, that we’ve paid, is »

Mosby family ties to police provide no answer to charge of anti-police bias [UPDATED]

Featured image Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore city’s state’s attorney, has countered charges that she’s biased against the police by saying that she comes from “five generations” of cops. But a closer look at her family history raises more questions about her view of the police than it answers. Chuck Ross of the Daily Caller reports that Mosby’s mother, Linda Thompson, was forced to retire from the Boston police force in 2008 after violating »

What the Iran deal is really about

Featured image Yesterday, I argued that President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran is driven by two motives, neither of which involves stopping, or even significantly slowing, the mullahs’ quest for nuclear weapons. In my view, Obama’s primary motives are (1) the desire to thaw U.S. relations with the Iranian regime and, through a grand bargain, usher in an age of strategic cooperation between Washington and Tehran and (2) constrain Israel from attacking »

The Iran nuclear arrangement: more than a bad deal, a betrayal

Featured image Ishaan Tharoor of the Washington Post provides an “analysis” of the Iran nuclear deal. After raving at length about the “historic deal,” Tharoor turns to the case against it. He writes: Critics of the deal, including Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Republican hawks in Washington, warn that, contrary to the Obama administration’s talking points, it gives Iran a ticket to becoming a nuclear superpower. These claims are somewhat undermined »

An Observation upon returning from France

Featured image Monday night, I returned from Paris after two weeks (minus the three days I spent in London for Joe Malchow’s wonderful wedding) in the French capital. During my stay, I thought less about the things that obsess me at home — politics, world affairs, and sports — and more about history and art, as well as how fortunate Joe and his lovely wife Olivia are to have found each other. »

The Iran deal — what difference at this point does it make?

Featured image It seems to me inevitable that, given the obvious flaws in the Obama administration’s nuclear deal, Iran will obtain nuclear weapons (barring outside military intervention) at roughly the time of its choosing with or without the deal. It also seems clear that, with or without this deal, the international sanctions regime will largely collapse, thanks to President Obama’s decisions first to negotiate with Iran and second to loosen sanctions before »

A word from Jim DeMint

Featured image Jim DeMint, president of the Heritage Foundation, has written a good, concise opening statement of the case against the Obama administration’s nuclear deal with Iran. DeMint states: If allowed to stand, the Vienna agreement announced today will make the world a much more dangerous place. It completely fails to cut off Iran’s path to nuclear weaponry. Indeed, it moves the world one step closer to a regional nuclear arms race »

Aging and sentimentality in judges

Featured image Before I head to Europe, let me expand, using thoughts Bill Otis presented to me, on why I think older judges are more likely than younger ones to decide cases based on sentiment. Resisting sentimentality requires discipline and energy. Discipline can subside with the onset of old age. As Bill puts it: By the time they get to their sixties, most talented lawyers have essentially made it in life, and »

Off to Europe

Featured image I will be in Europe for the next two weeks. In Paris, where I’ll be for a large portion of the trip, the Eiffel Tower will be illuminated, but presumably not in rainbow colors to celebrate gay marriage. Sad to say, the governments of the countries I’ll be visiting all have a better understanding of Iran, and world as a whole, than President Obama does. What a sad commentary. If, »

The quest for ideological purity in Supreme Court Justices

Featured image In our podcast last week, we tried to explain why Democratic-appointed Supreme Court Justices march in lockstep in the big, closely divided Supreme Court cases, while one Republican-appointed Justice (Anthony Kennedy) cannot be counted on at all to vote with his more reliably conservative brethren and a second (John Roberts) has parted company in two of most important cases decided in his tenure. I offered one possible explanation. Liberalism, I »

This day in baseball history: Twins win twice, cling to first place

Featured image 1965 was only the third year since 1948 that the New York Yankees did not win the American League pennant. Unlike the previous two instances — 1954 (when they won 103 games) and 1959 (when they were only 4 games back in early July) — the ’65 Yankees were never in contention. On this day 50 years ago, they were in sixth place, 10 games off the pace. That pace »

Hillary sags in early states

Featured image Rich Lowry says that a “plugged-in lefty” tells him he believes that Bernie Sanders will defeat Hillary Clinton in both Iowa and New Hampshire. This scenario may sound far-fetched, but polling data suggests it could come to pass. A new WMUR/CNN Granite State Poll, conducted by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center from June 18 to 24, puts Sanders within 8 points of Clinton, 43-35 (with a margin of »

Justice Kennedy’s eyes are wide shut on the gay rights assault on religion

Featured image In Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Justice Kennedy acknowledged the dangers of ruling that disparate impact analysis applies to Fair Housing Act cases, and he tried to erect limitations that would avoid these dangers. However, as Justice Alito showed in his dissent, the supposed limitations will not constrain liberal bureaucrats and judges. A parallel exchange can be found in today’s ruling finding a »

In housing case, Justice Kennedy’s eyes are wide shut

Featured image I wrote here about yesterday’s decision by the Supreme Court in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project. By a 5-4 vote, with Justice Kennedy writing for the majority, the Court held that the Fair Housing Act allows lawsuits based on disparate impact. Usually in a case like this, it is the dissent that warns of the dire consequences that may well flow from the »