Author Archives: Steven Hayward

Behind Science Fraud, Chapter 10

Featured image Time to update our series on science fraud from a few months ago, with news of a blockbuster research review effort that is making waves this week. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports today: A decade ago, John P.A. Ioannidis published a provocative and much-discussed paper arguing that most published research findings are false. It’s starting to look like he was right. The results of the Reproducibility Project are in, »

Today’s Obligatory Trump Post

Featured image So Donald Trump won’t name his favorite Bible verse because it is “very personal.” Here’s the video (just 40 seconds long): Why do I have the suspicion that Trump’s “very personal” favorite verse is probably one of those Old Testament passages about onanism, which would fit him very well? At least now we know what Trump is hiding under that very big bushel on the top of his head: his Christian »

Breaking: Judge Blocks New Obama Water Regulations

Featured image While we await the legal challenge to Obama’s greenhouse gas scheme, today a federal judge moved to block the EPA’s attempt to re-write the Clean Water Act and defy a key Supreme Court ruling from a decade ago. From The Hill just a few hours ago: A federal judge in North Dakota acted late Thursday to block the Obama administration’s controversial water pollution rule, hours before it was due to »

More Boxing the Pox on Vox

Featured image Vox’s historical illiteracy is not their only embarrassment this week. Philosopher Brian Leiter, who runs one of the most widely-read academic blogs (Leiter Reports), tells the story of how Vox solicited an article from Torbjorn Tannsjo, a well-regarded philosopher at Stockholm University, about the concept known as the “repugnant conclusion,” which is a recondite approach to thinking about population issues. (If you’re really curious, see this, but otherwise never mind.) »

The Socialist Dream Will Never Die

Featured image Not long ago I was listening to one of Russ Roberts’s archived “EconTalk” podcasts with the great Thomas Sowell (and if you don’t listen to EconTalk you’re missing one of the top podcast artists of our time—subscribe for free here), and was completely stunned by something Sowell said. When he was assigned Friedrich Hayek’s seminal essay “The Use of Knowledge in Society” as a graduate student, he didn’t get it. »

Exposing Our Fannie Again

Featured image From this morning’s Wall Street Journal: Fannie Mae wants to make it easier for working-class and multigenerational households to get a mortgage. The mortgage-finance company said Tuesday it would roll out a program this year that lets lenders include income from nonborrowers within a household, such as extended-family members, toward qualifying for a loan. The move is expected to open up mortgage access to a segment of the population that »

Trump at Gettysburg

Featured image You knew this was coming sooner or later—Trump’s version of the Gettysburg Address: Thanks. What an incredible crowd. They tell me this is the biggest crowd in the history of the North. A while back some founders got together. And I mean they were good people but they really didn’t know anything about building a country. C’mon, you know, let’s face facts. Franklin with his little glasses and Washington with »

The World Has Gone Crazy (Again)

Featured image So I read a few days ago that there have been long-running protests aimed at the Pokemon World Championships, culminating in this report from USA Today: Threats of violence over the Pokemon World Championships in Boston led to two Iowa men being arrested for stockpiling a trove of weapons in their car. Boston police said Sunday that convention security reported the threats on Thursday and the suspects were stopped as »

On Your Mark, Get Set, . . . Crash? (Updated)

Featured image So, I’m back from my overseas idyll, which included bagging a lion I hastily renamed Cecil (see photo below), and which means the usual jet lag, a large pile of snail mail, and lots of undone work even further behind than usual. Anything much happen while I was away? Wait . . . the stock market did what? As I write, about an hour before the Monday morning open on »

Title Nein from Outer Space

Featured image The problem with nearly every government program or regulation is that it spawns a private sector industry to leech off the regulation, as well as a new constituency group to support the perpetuation or expansion of the regime. Today’s example is the egregious Title IX sexual assault protocols for college campuses, which, as noted here previously, isn’t even a formal federal regulation. It proceeded from a “dear colleague” “guidance” letter »

What’s Happened to Liberalism in Two Sentences

Featured image The New York Times today carries a long news piece about the growing panic in Hillary world that has forced her to—gasp!—interrupt her Hamptons summer vacation to campaign among the plebes in the Midwest. Down near the bottom is this short paragraph, which I’m guessing no one at the Times flagged for being utterly hilarious—as well as revealing: Among the places where Mrs. Clinton enjoys stalwart support are the Hamptons, »

Is The Left Self-Destructing? The Evidence from Britain

Featured image More fun than watching the Hillary meltdown and the Democratic Party rage against the results of the Obama regime is to cast your gaze over to Britain, where the Labour Party seems to have forgotten the lesson of their 1983 election platform (which included a call for unilateral nuclear disarmament) which UK political junkies referred to as “the longest suicide note in history.” Labour was crushed in that election, and »

The Week in Pictures: Evergreen Edition

Featured image When a newspaper columnist goes on vacation but still owes regular pieces to his paper or distributor, they file a couple of “evergreen” columns—pieces about general interest subjects—sports, philosophy, whatever—not dependent on the day’s headlines. That’s my situation this week. Right now Power Line Baltic Command is retreating from Russia before the winter begins, and as internet at sea is apparently still transmitted by smoke signal, I thought I’d better »

From Power Line Baltic Command: “An Ocean Liner Without Lifeboats”?

Featured image I’m not really observing radio silence this week, but if you’ve ever been on a cruise ship you’ll know that shipboard Internet operates by smoke signal or some other antiquated technology. (Not to worry: I already have this Saturday’s “Week in Pictures” filed for posting automatically, in case I end up in a Russian jail cell on Friday.) Currently steaming through the Baltic Sea with our pals at the Pacific »

Alan Carlin’s “Environmentalism Gone Mad”

Featured image Four years ago I reported here on the case of Alan Carlin, the 38-year career employee of the EPA who was being silenced because of his dissenting views on climate change. The EPA suppressed Carlin’s research into the weaknesses of the EPA’s “findings” on climate change science, and ordered Carlin to cease any further work on the subject. For a long time I have pondered the idea of trying to »

Whitney Ball, RIP

Featured image It is a double shock to learn that Whitney Ball has passed away, on the same day as Peter Schramm. Most Power Line readers probably never heard of Whitney, but she was an unsung hero of the Right, and if I showed you some of the attacks the Left made on her in recent years (I won’t dignify them now) you’d get her immediately. A little more presently on that. »

The Insincerity of the Iran Agreement Defenders

Featured image The debate over the Iran agreement is provoking flashbacks to the Cold War, when disarmament movements in the West aimed chiefly at the disarmament of the western democracies. From my email in-box, a message from the “Global Zero” campaign (and note the punch line at the end of this first paragraph): “As we mark the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we must consider the present-day »