Author Archives: Steven Hayward

The Political Failure of Libertarianism

Featured image Sad news out of Iowa yesterday that the Libertarian Party senate candidate, Doug Butzier, was killed in a plane crash. Political junkies immediately speculated that this might well tip the close Iowa senate race to Joni Ernst. I’m not so certain of this; I think a lot of purist libertarian voters might just not vote for a senate candidate at all, or might even vote for the Democrat on the »

Scruton to the Rescue

Featured image Roger Scruton has a new book out How To Be a Conservative.  Does Roger publish a book every week?  It sure seems like it sometimes; I’m still working my way through The Soul of the World. Anyway, if you’re running behind on your reading pile, as I always am, you should avail yourself of Richard Reinsch’s interview/podcast with Roger about his new book at the Liberty Fund’s indispensable LibertyLawSite.  (In »

Today’s Climate Comics: Hide Your Cat

Featured image Apparently feeling outflanked by Naomi Klein’s climate comic book This Changes Everything, the other Naomi (Oreskes)—author of the original version of the “97 percent” canard—and her sometimes co-author Erik Conway are out with a new climate comic book with the less than subtle title The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future. You might want to keep this tome from these would-be Spenglers handy, because some of their »

Oil: What Are the Saudis Up To?

Featured image The biggest energy story of the last decade obviously has been the U.S. oil boom, which defied everyone’s predictions—including the oil companies themselves. You simply can’t find a single forecast from 10 years ago that called for the kind of increase in domestic oil production that we’ve seen in just the last four years. When the price of oil started rising more than a decade ago—topping $60 a barrel at »

Chesterton in Song!

Featured image For fellow G.K. Chesterton fans out there (and there are a lot of you, it appears), here’s some news you can use. Who knew—I certainly didn’t—that Prof. Ross McKitrick of Guelph University in Canada, who is one of the most important critics of climate change alarmism, is also a music producer! And he has turned his talents to the use of the Nicole Ensing Band, whose debut CD, “Riddles and »

More Problems for the Deep Ocean Warming Theory

Featured image New study from NASA last week: NASA Study Finds Earth’s Ocean Abyss Has Not Warmed The cold waters of Earth’s deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, analyzed satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013 and »

Canadian Oil: Not So Bad After All

Featured image As mentioned before in our ongoing coverage of the Keystone pipeline mania, the State Department’s finding of no significant environmental impact from the pipeline is based on the common sense understanding that Canada’s oil is going to come out of the ground and go somewhere, and if it doesn’t go to us by pipeline, it will go to China and Europe by tanker. The climatistas labor under the childish fantasy »

Intelligence Failure: A Conversation with Herbert Meyer, Part 2

Featured image I’m finally getting back to processing more of my wide-ranging conversation with former CIA honcho Herbert Meyer from last month.  (You can see part 1 of our conversation here.)  In this short segment, we talk more about the importance of knowing what you’re looking for, why it is important not to demand too much information, and how easy it is to go astray by sticking too closely to your own »

Department of Useless Intellectuals

Featured image I’ve decided against starting a regular feature, or worse still a contest, to treat the question of who are America’s most over-rated intellectuals, because if you answered “All of them,” it would be difficult to gainsay such a common sense conclusion. It would of course be hard to top someone with the megaphone of Tom Friedman, who writes in his column today: ISIS operates just like an “invasive species” in »

The Week in Pictures: Cartagena Hookers Edition

Featured image Well, actually, no, I don’t have any pictures or cartoons of the fast-breaking Cartagena hookers story that Scott mentions below.  But I can’t let Jonah Goldberg have all the fun with this story.  And it’s such great click bait.  Would you really have preferred an Ebola-related edition?  Oh no you wouldn’t!  Shut up. So when did Rolling Stone become The Onion: Yeah, point this out and Ben Affleck will call »

Curry at Slow Boil

Featured image The climate change argument has been repetitive for years now, but so is the back and forth of a tennis game. Slow changes in scientific opinion, and subtle shifts in scientific findings, will make no difference to the climatistas who are invested in the catastrophic climate scenario, nor to the grasping politicians who pant to take control of the energy marketplace. Still, it is worth taking note of new research »

When Political Correctness Collides With Itself

Featured image Sooner or later—usually sooner—the Left’s various politically correct enthusiasms collide with each other. The latest concerns pink breast cancer awareness totems. The Baker-Hughes oil drilling company is using pink drill bits in partnership with the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure folks: This is the second year Baker Hughes has given its traditional black and gold drill bits a makeover in October. Last year, the company painted 500. It’s »

O’Malley=O’Doofus

Featured image There has been lots of talk that Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley wants very much to run for president in 2016 or perhaps 2020, and yesterday he gave the surest sign that he will indeed be a candidate in the Democratic primaries: he said something irredeemably stupid. In a long and very boring interview with CNN yesterday O’Malley said that “WiFi is a human right.” The most salient thing about the »

When Old School Meets New Age

Featured image So where have I been all week? You wouldn’t believe it if I told you. So I’ll have to tell you: I was at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, the infamous home of new age spirituality where, I couldn’t help but notice, the “clothes optional” rule is still in effect. (I’ve written before about Esalen here and here.)  I couldn’t resist the chance to unleash my inner Hunter S. »

Today’s Chesterton Helping

Featured image So here’s my Chesterton shelf—most of it anyway (I’m missing the biographies, still in a box somewhere)—finally assembled in one place in my office.  I’m pretty sure I’ve shared before the story, perhaps apocryphal, of Chesterton, a stout man, meeting Shaw (thin as a rail) on the street: Chesterton: My God man, from the looks of you, there’s a famine in the land! Shaw: And from the looks of you, »

Deep Six the Deep Ocean Theory?

Featured image Another week, another pile of climate change news, much of it nonsensical as usual. You knew that Ebola would be connected to climate change, right? Actually, this immediate default theme in the media was even too much for the true believer climatistas at ClimateProgress.org: Media Jumps to Conclusions on Ebola and Climate Change If you read Newsweek or CNBC this week, you may be under the impression that one of »

Who Reads Power Line?

Featured image Richard Morgan, that’s who.  Morgan is the William Nelson Cromwell professor of constitutional and international law at Bowdoin College in Maine, where he is that rarity in higher education today—he teaches undergraduates about the Constitution.  One of the untold scandals/travesties of higher education today is how fast constitutional law for undergraduates is disappearing from most political science curricula.  (There was even a panel on the problem at this year’s American »