Books

The administrative threat revisited

Featured image At the RealClearPolicy site, editor M. Anthony Mills has posted a good summary of Professor Philip Hamburger’s critique of the administrative state — the regime of administrative law promulgated and administered by administrative agencies — set forth this year in the inspired Encounter Books pamphlet The Administrative Threat. I recently noted Professor Hamburger’s pamphlet here. I wrote about Professor Hamburger’s great work of scholarship on the subject — Is Administrative »

The romance of Soviet stooges

Featured image Vivian Gornick is the author of the 1979 book titled The Romance of Communism. It’s a romance with which many readers of the New York Times are familiar even if the thought of it is revolting to anyone who knows the relevant history. Earlier this year in anticipation of May Day the Times turned over valuable real estate in its Sunday Review section to Gornick to celebrate the time “When »

How to read Herman Wouk

Featured image Yesterday CBS News profiled author Herman Wouk at the ripe old age of 102. The cluelessness of the CBS correspondent made the interview uncomfortable viewing, but it reminded me that I had meant to draw attention to the essay by Williams College Professor Michael Lewis about Wouk. This Michael Lewis, I should add, is Faison-Pierson-Stoddard Professor of Art History at Williams College, not the popular journalist and author. Published in »

Recalling Max Eastman

Featured image I often grab an old, forgotten book to take with me on overseas trips, and for my current trip I grabbed Max Eastman’s Reflections on the Failure of Socialism. Eastman is one of those mostly forgotten figures from the first half of the 20th century who left Communism and became a conservative of a kind. Eastman had been, for a time, the editor of The Masses, and later The Liberator—both »

Bureaucracy in America

Featured image I have been threatening for a few years now to write a book with the title Bureaucracy in America, which would attempt to do for our administrative state what Tocqueville’s Democracy in America did in the 19th century—explain the deeper cultural and philosophical aspects of the practice of American democracy. For it is Tocqueville who offers the preface to a serious reconsideration of our administrative state today, in his famous »

The administrative threat

Featured image Researching the constitutionality of the regime of administrative law, I came across a notice early in 2014 that Philip Hamburger’s Is Administrative Law Unlawful? was forthcoming in hardcover from the University of Chicago Press (it’s now available in paperback). “The audacity of hope” had nothing on the audacity of Hamburger. Indeed, the audacity of Hamburger was a cure for the audacity of hope. The question he posed in the title »

Strange death of Europe

Featured image Douglas Murray (@DouglasKMurray on Twitter) is associate editor of Britain’s Spectator and a senior fellow at the Gatestone Institute. He is a prolific columnist. Gatestone has compiled his columns for the institute here. Murray’s new book is The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam. It is a book full of portents and warnings for us. Murray launched his book with a lecture at the Heritage Foundation last week posted »

Why Are Liberals Always So Upset?

Featured image Yesterday on our VIP live webcast, we talked briefly about the sources of Trump Derangement Syndrome (TDS), which I argue predates Trump and would likely be present if any other Republican, even mild-mannered Jeb Bush, were in the White House right now. TDS has its roots in the lazy presumption that liberalism represents “the side of history,” as though “History” is a self-conscious thing with only one direction. This presumption is, in »

Mugging Mr. Murray: Murray speaks

Featured image American Enterprise Institute fellow Charles Murray must rank among our most prominent living social scientists. At a May 17 hearing of the Joint Economic Committee convened by Senator and JEC vice chairman Mike Lee, Murray was included on a panel of social scientists testifying on the state of social capital in America — the subject of a new report released by the committee. Testifying along with Murray on the panel »

Book of the Year: St. Hillary of Hippo

Featured image While we await the threatened—and as yet untitled—memoir of Hillary Clinton, we can delight in a new book also about the inner reaches of Herself, coming in August: Strong for a Moment Like This: The Daily Devotions of Hillary Rodham Clinton. It’s 416 pages! Maybe they are blank pages like that other recent classic, Michael Knowles’s Reasons to Vote for Democrats? No—this is apparently a serious book. Hillary doesn’t joke »

Ordeal of Omaha Beach

Featured image Reader Patti Kruse wrote us last year to encourage our remembrance of the D-Day landings on the Normandy beaches. “My dad landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day,” she told us. “He was one of the fortunate ones, as he was never physically injured and managed to survive from D-Day all the way through the Battle of the Bulge and V-E Day. He rarely spoke about his experience except to say »

Cardiac Arrest: Howard Root unbound

Featured image John recently hosted our friend Howard Root at a packed Center of the American Experiment lunch forum in downtown Minneapolis. Howard told the story of his experience as chief executive officer of Vascular Solutions caught in the crosshairs of the federal government when prosecutors sought to put him in the big house and his company out of business. It was the most powerful 45-minute presentation I have ever seen. Howard »

CRB: Mobility and nobility

Featured image This morning we conclude our preview of the new (Soring) issue of the Claremont Review of Books. Thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I have read the new issue in galley to select three pieces to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. As always, wanting to do right by the magazine and by our readers, I had a hard time choosing. You, however, can do »

CRB: Sending jobs overseas

Featured image This morning we continue our preview of the new issue of the Claremont Review of Books. Thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I read the new issue in galley to select three pieces to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. As always, wanting to do right by the magazine and by our readers, I had a hard time choosing. You, however, can do your own »

Make it with the author of “Making It”

Featured image In a nearby post John notes our coming VIP Live event via Google Hangout this coming Wednesday evening with Norman Podhoretz. We invited Mr. Podhoretz to join us to celebrate the republication of >Making It by New York Review Books in what is essentially a fiftieth anniversary edition as a NYRB Classic last week. Our get-together is scheduled to take place on Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. (Eastern), 7:00 p.m. (Central). »

A book deal for Huma Abedin?

Featured image Huma Abedin, Hillary Clinton’s long-time confidante, is looking for a book deal. Reportedly, her asking price is $2 million. Jazz Shaw doubts that there’s a sufficient market for Abedin’s story to support this price. He may be right. However, Abedin strikes me as by far the most interesting person in Hillary Clinton’s world, with the obvious exception of Bill. First, there is her family background and ethnicity. Her parents are »

The return of “Making It”

Featured image Many conservatives who follow politics came to know Norman Podhoretz through his work as the editor of Commentary and his own essays, most of which were published in Commentary itself. He moved notably from the left to the right, shed friends and influenced many people like me along the way. He could write the book on How To Lose Friends and Influence People, and more or less has under other »