Books

This year’s model

Featured image Certification as the liberals’ official angry black man is a lucrative gig. The market is upscale, but the job is only temporary. Fashions change, or rather remain subject to a cycle. The job isn’t easy; it requires high attainment in the art of performance. Black rage must be precisely matched to liberal guilt. James Baldwin provides the original model, in the essays originally published in the New Yorker and then »

Old Friends on the Road

Featured image I’m at St. John’s College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, this week, participating in one of their “Summer Classics” great books seminars, and who should I run into but Bruce Sanborn of St. Paul, Minnesota. Bruce is not only one of the earliest readers of Power Line, but is also the person who is ultimately responsible for my meeting John Hinderaker and Scott Johnson, and hence ultimately becoming a Power »

One-eyed jacks of Wessex [With Comment by John]

Featured image When Professor Lesley Goodman left St. Paul to undertake her new responsibilities in the English Department at Union College, she left a long reading list of Victorian novels and modernist literature for me to continue my pursuits. I am slowly following up, though I greatly miss her helping hand. She is an inspired teacher of literature. In her course on the Victorian novel at Macalester College I reveled in George »

NY Times Surrenders to Ted Cruz

Featured image We wrote here and here about the New York Times’s effort to sabotage Ted Cruz’s new book, A Time for Truth by leaving it off their best seller list, even though it sold the third-highest number of books (hardcover nonfiction) in its debut week. The Times arrogantly asserted that no one was really buying Cruz’s book, and its “sales were limited to strategic bulk purchases.” Ponder that: the Times spokeswoman »

Breaking China Over “Shattered Consensus”

Featured image The folks over at RealClearBooks have arranged point-counterpoint style rival reviews of James Piereson’s new book Shattered Consensus: The Rise and Decline of America’s Postwar Political Order, one from me, and one from Will Marshall of the Progressive Policy Institute. I’ve reposted my review immediately below. You can find Marshall’s review here, and Jim Piereson’s reply to Marshall here. And at the bottom you’ll find the sound file of my interview with »

Meet the new Jim Crow, same as the old BS

Featured image This week President Obama commuted the sentences of “46 non-violent drug offenders.” In commuting these sentences, Obama is doing his thing to lead and otherwise contribute to the race-based assault on law enforcement. As I noted a while back, if you want to get a handle on this particular assault, you must acquaint yourself with Michelle Alexander and The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.. Published »

Churchill on “A Peculiar Type of Brainy People”

Featured image As with so many other things, Churchill was on to the problem of the administrative state and today’s presumptuous liberal cosmopolitanism from early on.  A 1933 speech offers a perfect description of our Beltway mentality today: The worst difficulties from which we suffer do not come from without. They come from within. They do not come from the cottages of the wage-earners. They come from a peculiar type of brainy »

New books, dead authors

Featured image Pending the arrival of Ammo Grrrll tomorrow, I need laugh now more than ever, and I do not think I’m alone. In the run-up to July 4, moreover, we have the time for it. Joe Queenan provides the opportunity for more than one laugh in his Wall Street Journal Review column “New books, dead authors” (accessible here via Google) of this past weekend. Queenan observes that Tom Clancy and other »

The Candidates and Their Reading Lists

Featured image Forget Jeb’s and Hillary’s tax returns. We get it: they both make a lot of money from speeches and such. More interesting is what they read, or claim to read. Last year The Atlantic put together a list of Jeb’s and Hillary’s current book list. In one sense it doesn’t much matter whether they actually read the books they list; more revealing is what they chose to disclose. Here’s Hillary’s »

In praise of Lesley Goodman

Featured image In his elegy of William Butler Yeats, W.H. Auden concludes with this couplet offering advice addressed to an unnamed poet: “In the prison of his days/Teach the free man how to praise.” This morning I want to take a brief timeout to praise Lesley Goodman. Professor Goodman has a Ph.D. in English from Harvard. She is a voracious and learned reader at the beginning of what should be a great »

Iran (and Obama) vs. Israel (2)

Featured image Former Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren’s Ally: My Journey Across the Israeli-American Divide is out from Random House today. The book is part autobiography, part memoir, part history and part (as they say in the bookstore) current events. I urge interested readers to pick it up now and study it with care. The book makes a valuable contribution to recent history in which he has been a participant and to which »

Allen Weinstein, RIP

Featured image One of the things Hugh Hewitt likes to do when he has a liberal journalist or thinker on his radio show—especially a younger one—is to ask first, “Do you think Alger Hiss was a Soviet spy?” He does this for two reasons. First, to test historical literacy. It is amazing how many young liberals know nothing of the Hiss case, and as such this question is a good proxy for »

The abandonment of Israel

Featured image Michael Oren is the former Israeli Ambassador to the United States and newly elected member of Israel’s Knesset (as a member of the Kulanu Party). He is also an accomplished historian and author. His new book, to be published next week, is Ally: My Journey Across the American-Israeli Divide. I just received an advance copy of the book for a podcast interview with Ambassador Oren to take place later this »

Mark Bauerlein: The State of the American Mind

Featured image Mark Bauerlein and Adam Bellow have edited an intriguing volume of essays reporting on The State of the American Mind: 16 Leading Critics on the new Anti-Intellectualism. The book, officially published by Templeton Press today, presents as a kind of update on Allan Bloom’s The Closing of the American Mind (1987). Closing was published, with a foreword by the late Saul Bellow that helped draw attention to the book. (In »

Horowitz in winter

Featured image FrontPage managing editor Jamie Glazov commissioned me to review David Horowitz’s new book, You’re Going To Be Dead One Day: A Love Story (Regnery, 176 pages, $24.99). Today is the book’s official publication date and the book is now available at Amazon. Jamie has authorized me to post my review on Power Line in the hope that it might introduce new readers to David’s memoiristic books of recent years. This »

Tom Stoppard: Still Fooling With Us After All These Years

Featured image In the Daily Mail this morning, I came across this headline: Sir Tom Stoppard admits inventing a quote from a fake professor to go in the programme for one of his most famous plays. Stoppard is one of my favorite playwrights, so I followed the link, even though the idea of Stoppard inventing a quote by a fake professor is not exactly a shock. This was the story: Playwright Sir »

CRB: Woman in full

Featured image Today we conclude our preview of the new issue of the Claremont Review of Books. Subscribe here for the heavily subsidized, ridiculously low price of $19.95 and get immediate online access thrown in for free. With our previews this week I have tried to convey some sense of the range of pieces on offer in the issue. On Wednesday we looked at Bill Voegeli’s essay on the uprising against political »