Communism

A fitting end: Castro’s hearse breaks down

Featured image The vehicle carrying Fidel Castro’s remains during his funeral parade broke down yesterday. Soldiers had to push it through the streets. How symbolic! What could be more fitting, given the broken down nature of the antique Cuban state produced by Castro? There have been plenty of choice comments on Twitter. Here’s the obvious take in the form of an old joke: NOTHING in Cuba works. Except the prostitutes. Here’s my »

Gott im Himmel

Featured image In the video below (about 8 minutes), former Guardian literary editor Richard Gott debates Gatestone Institute senior fellow Douglas Murray regarding the legacy of Fidel Castro. Why Sky News thought it was a good idea to call on Gott to advocate the case for Castro is not immediately clear. Gott faithfully spouts the Communist Party line on Castro, but it’s a line that Justin Trudeau and useful idiots everywhere share. »

Stalin? Whodat???

Featured image I think the study of ancient history extends to the advent of the first Clinton administration in 1993 or so. As we all know, and as former Latin students might say, ancient history has fallen into desuetude. I think this may explain the finding reported in Jamie Gregora’s Daily Signal story “This is the percentage of millennials who believe George W. Bush killed more people than Stalin.” I’m sure millennials »

The Rosenberg File revisited

Featured image Tomorrow night 60 Minutes will broadcast a story on the Rosenberg spy case featuring the Rosenbergs’ two sons, Michael and Robert Meeropol. 60 Minutes has posted a preview of the segments here. According to the preview, Michael argues that Ethel Rosenberg was “collateral damage” – framed by prosecutors for a crime she did not commit in an effort to get their father to cooperate with FBI investigators. Robert asserts: “Our »

Bech in Czech

Featured image Paul Mirengoff’s tribute to the courage and the sacrifice of the Czech Olympic champion Vera Caslavska brought to mind one of my favorite passages in the works of John Updike that I have managed to read. Updike was a voluminous and accomplished writer in every literary form, though I think he was a master of the short story in particular. Updike wrote enough stories to fill three small volumes about »

The Cold War Never Ended

Featured image A lot of conservatives have expressed shock and disorientation at the revival of enthusiasm for socialism, not to mention the shattering of the consensus for free trade, low taxes, open markets, freedom of expression, and so forth. It is clear—and I wrote a long memo about this at AEI about five years ago that I cannot now find—that we all made a major mistake in the early 1990s when the »

Obama on freedom vs. totalitarianism — whatever works

Featured image President Obama didn’t just tango during his visit to Argentina. He also addressed a Young Leaders of the Americas Initiative meeting. During his remarks, Obama stumbled through an embarrassing discourse on “capitalism vs. communism.” The would-be leader of what used to be called the Free World treated the issue as just another false choice, sort of the way he used to speak of Red States and Blue States before he »

Che chic, Obama edition

Featured image President Obama is proud of his visit to Cuba this week. He’s enjoying himself immensely. I bet he even enjoyed the group photo that captured him standing in front of a mural of Che Guevara in Havana this morning (below). My God. pic.twitter.com/rZYgnTi3dh — Comfortably Smug (@ComfortablySmug) March 21, 2016 As Jay Nordlinger has never tired of reminding the ignorant, this was Che: He was an Argentinian revolutionary who served »

Homage to Catalonia, Washington Post style

Featured image In this obituary, the Washington Post celebrates Delmer Berg, the last known living U.S. volunteer in the Spanish Civil War. The Post’s Emily Langer informs us that Berg served in the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. This unit “was named in honor of the 16th president,” she adds helpfully. The Communist Party’s appropriation of the Great Emancipator’s name was one of the most cynical public relations stunts ever. Other than Adolph Hitler, »

A diverting move

Featured image If you, like me, are looking for something completely different, you may want to check out Bill Kristol’s just-released conversation with former world chess champion and human rights activist Garry Kasaparov (video below). In the conversation Kasparov reflects on his upbringing in the old Soviet Union and his journey from questioning whether Communism could be reformed to his ultimate conviction that the Soviet Union had to go. Kasparov recalls his »

Lies of “Trumbo”

Featured image The film Trumbo was released on November 6. Starring Bryan Cranston as the celebrated screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, the film purports to revisit Hollywood’s blacklist. The film follows the party line, so to speak, and was generally well received. It was in any event mostly taken at face value as history even by those who found it wanting. The film came in third on my short list of worst films of »

Robert Conquest, RIP

Featured image Sad news this hour of the passing of the great historian Robert Conquest, at the age of 98. Conquest surely deserves to be counted among the top five most important historians of Communism and the Soviet Union in our time. His book The Great Terror, about the Soviet purges and deliberate famine policy of the 1930s, made it impossible for anyone to deny the essential character of Stalin’s regime. But »

Allen Weinstein, RIP

Featured image One of the things Hugh Hewitt likes to do when he has a liberal journalist or thinker on his radio show—especially a younger one—is to ask first, “Do you think Alger Hiss was a Soviet spy?” He does this for two reasons. First, to test historical literacy. It is amazing how many young liberals know nothing of the Hiss case, and as such this question is a good proxy for »

Stalinism Abroad and at Home

Featured image Here are three photos of good old-fashioned Stalinist architecture, but only two of them are from former Communist countries. See if you can spot the one from here at home, and guess where.  (Answer key below.) »

Kim Ode’s favorite Communist [updated with Ode’s response]

Featured image Yesterday’s Star Tribune featured Kim Ode’s profile of former Minnesota gubernatorial candidate Erwin Marquit. Marquit is dying and Ode is fawning. The source of Ode’s attraction to Marquit is Marquit’s run for governor in 1974 as a Communist. The romance of Communism hasn’t worn off for Ode or her editors at the Star Tribune. Ode’s profile is “Erwin Marquit, state’s best-known Communist, reflects on his life.” I’m sure Ode is »

Communism works, says Rep. Joe Garcia

Featured image In the course of attacking Republicans for opposing amnesty, Democrat Rep. Joe Garcia of Florida, declares: “We’ve proved that communism works; if you give everyone a good government job, there’s no crime.” Here’s the video: If you say so, Joe. But can’t we skip amnesty and just pay for everyone in Mexico to have “a good government job”? By the way, both Larry Sabato and Charlie Cook rate Garcia’s race »

Peace, they say: Nordlinger vs. Lundestad

Featured image The Nobel Peace Prize Forum was held in Minneapolis on the campus of the University of Minnesota over the weekend. Yesterday was Global Day. I’m not sure what made it Global Day, but it was. However, I am sure what the highlight of the day was. It was previewed in the Star Tribune here. At noon Geir Lundestad, director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, debated National Review senior »