Donald Trump

This Week in Trump

Featured image Normally I don’t traffic in the typical media thumb-sucking about what’s immediately ahead for the President, or other unctuous, subjunctive commands about what the President “must do” if he is going to advance. But I make an exception now because I have a sense that Trump might make some big moves this week following on his highly successful and consequential first foreign trip. How do I know it was a »

A coup by any other name

Featured image In the post “Trump agonistes” last week I noted what I saw in the news stories that have created the consuming controversies of the past few weeks: hostile officials inside the executive branch of the government seeking the removal of Donald Trump from office. They are powerful. They lack any qualms about abusing their positions. They are determined. And they have the invaluable assistance of the Democrats’ mainstream media adjunct. »

Manchester this time

Featured image As we take in the carnage in Manchester, words fail us. Words fail to do justice to the tragedy of the lives taken and the bodies maimed. Words fail to account for the protracted and multifaceted conflict in which we are engaged. Words fail to do justice to our impotent outrage. Words fail to express our dread knowledge of the evil on display. We almost wish to be wrong this »

Let’s call the whole thing unlikely

Featured image Victor Davis Hanson is a classicist, a military historian and a shrewd observer of the current scene. Everything he writes is worth reading. I do my best to catch all his columns and essays, but I missed his recent appearance on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News show. RealClearPolitics has posted a video of the segment below along with a partial transcript including embedded links here. In it Dr. Hanson argues that »

Trump in Riyadh: Speaking of reset

Featured image President Trump just concluded his speech to the assembled leaders of 50 Muslim countries assembled to hear him in Riyadh. The ever popular New York Times quotes a bit from the speech in the course of reporting and opining on it in the story by Peter Baker and Michael Shear. I can’t find either a transcript or video yet. Here I would like briefly to offer a few preliminary impressions »

Nut Job II

Featured image The latest anonymous leak/news story, the New York Times’s “nut job” scoop, represents a return to the crude and vulgar Donald Trump with whom we became familiar during the campaign. That is, assuming that the anonymously sourced report on a memo by an unidentified author is true. Assuming the report’s veracity–something that can’t be taken for granted in the case of the Times–this appears to be another self-inflicted wound, the »

I, nut job

Featured image We should note for the record the latest New York Times Trump-bashing leak. It arrives with a twist. This one seems to come — courtesy of “an American official” reading a memo to the Times — from inside the White House itself. Trump is now under attack by his own staff. Meeting in the Oval Office on May 10 with Russia’s ambassador and foreign minister, President Trump shared his feelings »

How Barack Obama Conspired With an Enemy to Undermine US Foreign Policy

Featured image The Democrats are trying to make a scandal out of the fact that representatives of the Trump campaign communicated with Russians, even though those communications were 100% appropriate. I had forgotten about this post, which I wrote in March 2015, until Rush Limbaugh read from it on his program yesterday. It reminds us what a REAL scandal involving a presidential campaign and foreign policy looks like: In 2008, the Bush »

Now I Get It

Featured image During the long campaign I wondered about rumors that the Clintons were secretly behind Trump’s candidacy, or least least hoping he would win the GOP nomination as he’d be the easiest to beat. There’s lots of reporting (and some leaked emails) that the person the Clintons most feared in the GOP field was . . . Jeb Bush. Which shows how bad the Clintons have become at politics. The best »

Trump agonistes

Featured image Reading the news stories that have created the consuming controversies of the past few days, this is what I see. Hostile officials inside the executive branch of the government seek the removal of Donald Trump from office. They are powerful. They lack any qualms about abusing their positions. And they are determined. With malicious intent, “current officials” inside the intelligence agencies with access to top secret information, for example, have »

Trump’s big trip

Featured image President Trump departs later this week on his first trip abroad since taking office. It is a trip with five stops including Riyadh, Jerusalem, Rome, Brussels and Sicily. The stops in Europe involve meetings with Pope Francis at the Vatican, with our NATO partners in Brussels and with the leaders of the G7 countries in Sicily. This afternoon the White House invited journalists to join a conference call with a »

McMaster’s denial

Featured image General McMaster emerged from the White House last night to read a statement denying the gist of the eye-opening Washington Post story by Greg Miller and Greg Jaffe posted earlier yesterday evening. The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal have reported companion versions of the story. Although General McMaster serves as President Trump’s national security adviser at the pleasure of the president, he is a man of unblemished »

Is Trump the New Nixon?

Featured image That certainly is how Democrats try to portray him. Trump firing Comey = Nixon firing Cox. Right? Wrong. But here is another one: With ‘tapes’ tweet, Trump evokes Nixon’s White House. The reference is to this tweet by the president: James Comey better hope that there are no "tapes" of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 12, 2017 That might have »

Comey declines to appear before Senate intel committee

Featured image James Comey will not appear in a closed session before the Senate Intelligence Committee next Tuesday. He had been invited to testify by Chairman Richard Burr and top Democrat Mark Warner. Any way you look at it, Comey’s decision makes sense. Comey surely could some time to decompress. He’s probably had his fill of testifying before Congress. Assuming that Comey wants to fight back against President Trump, an understandable desire »

How much more black could this be?

Featured image It’s all Comey all the time in the mainstream media. Following in the footsteps of addled guitarist Nigel Tufnel on Spinal Tap’s comeback tour of the United States in the film named after the group, the talking heads of the mainstream media have turned the volume up to 11. By the lights of the mainstream media, Trump’s firing of Comey, well, it’s Nixon, or Hitler, or something. Whatever it is, »

Trump: Genius or Savant?

Featured image From the beginning of Trump’s implausible rise to the presidency, I’ve wondered whether he’s a Chauncey Gardner-style idiot savant (which is what liberals always thought of Reagan, even after he demolished them at successive elections), a shrewd genius of sorts, or just plain lucky. Increasingly the evidence leans toward the second explanation—that underneath Trump’s verb-tense and syntactically-challenged stream-of-consciousness speaking (and Tweeting) style, there is a shrewdness about him that bespeaks »

CNN hosts accuse Trump of “witness intimidation” [UPDATED]

Featured image Today, in advance of Sally Yates’ testimony before a Senate committee, President Trump tweeted: Ask Sally Yates, under oath, if she knows how classified information got into the newspapers soon after she explained it to W.H. Counsel. Yates was asked that question at the Senate hearing. She responded that she didn’t know. Former DNI James Clapper was asked the same question. He gave the same answer. CNN host John King »