Immigration

DACA at the five year mark

Featured image Mark Krikorian points out that today is the fifth anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. DACA is President Obama’s lawless amnesty diktat. It enables adult illegal aliens who claim to have come to the U.S. before age 16 to get work permits, Social Security numbers, driver’s licenses, etc. Nearly 800,000 people have done so. Candidate Donald Trump promised to end DACA on “day one.” Like much »

The RAISE Act: A Step In the Right Direction, But Nowhere Near Enough

Featured image A reader who is a long-time immigration skeptic and a close student of the issue takes off from a Ross Douthat column on the proposed RAISE Act: Douthat writes: …you can address many of the costs of mass immigration by embracing the new bill’s points system without also making its steep cuts. Puh-leeez!……“steep cuts”? That’s absurd to the point of being intentionally obtuse, if not outright mendacious! The proposal is »

In praise of the RAISE Act, Part Two

Featured image A friend and long-time Power Line reader has this to say in response to my post in praise of the RAISE Act — the immigration reform proposal of Sens. Cotton and Perdue that President Trump forcefully endorsed yesterday: Yesterday on my drive home, I listened to a long NPR radio story about the bill’s introduction. As the story ended, I drove past a large apartment complex that is being built »

Associated Press Smears Stephen Miller [Updated]

Featured image Yesterday’s dustup between presidential aide Stephen Miller and CNN’s Jim Acosta, which Scott wrote about here, has turned into one of the silliest kerfuffles in memory. (Video is at the link, a transcript of yesterday’s press briefing is here.) The idea that a poem somehow stands in the way of reforming our immigration system (the salient features of which, by the way, date only to 1965) is absurd. Yet the »

In praise of the RAISE Act

Featured image In February, I wrote about the Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment (RAISE) Act. This legislation, proposed by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, would cut legal immigration to the U.S. in half and prioritize high-skilled immigrants, while ending family preferences for all but the spouses and minor children of U.S. citizens and legal permanent legal residents. Today, President Trump, with the two sponsoring Senators by his side, publicly backed »

Accosting Acosta

Featured image CNN reporter Jim Acosta loves the limelight at the White House press briefings and doesn’t particularly mind if he makes a fool of himself in the process. Of course, it helps not to know when you’re making a fool of yourself. At today’s White House press briefing Acosta sought to debate White House adviser Stephen Miller on the merits of the of the Reforming American Immigration for a Strong Economy »

By European Standards, Macron Is Courageous

Featured image During the French presidential election, Emmanuel Macron didn’t impress me. He seemed like the mother country’s version of Justin Trudeau. But earlier this month, he scandalized proper opinion in the EU with some straight talk about Africa: At a G20 summit press conference in Hamburg on July 8, French President Emmanuel Macron answered a call for an African “Marshall Plan” from a Cote d’Ivoire journalist. Macron’s stern, clear-eyed rebuff to »

What would Sessions’ ouster mean for immigration?

Featured image President Trump’s latest attack on Jeff Sessions is perhaps his most stupid. Here is what Trump told the Wall Street Journal: When they say he endorsed me, I went to Alabama. I had 40,000 people. He was a senator from Alabama. I won the state by a lot, massive numbers. A lot of the states I won by massive numbers. But he was a senator, he looks at 40,000 people »

Clown show follies with the Times

Featured image When three Somali Minnesotans went to trial in Minneapolis last year on terrorism charges, the New York Times skipped the proceedings. Times reporter Jack Healy arrived in town just in time for the verdicts. Healy’s article reporting the verdicts, written with freelancer Matt Furber, turned for comment to Burhan Mohumed, a “community organizer” and friend of the defendants who condemned the verdicts as “purely political.” Judge Michael Davis presided at »

No Groping, Damn It!

Featured image American liberals want to take in lots of Islamic refugees from the Middle East and Africa, presumably because that policy has been so successful in Europe. This is, of course, a dubious premise, as we have noted many times. This story comes from Austria, and it must be legit because it is reported in the Sun. Heh. As best I can tell, though, it is authentic: A swimming pool has »

How did that Russian lawyer get to stay in the U.S.?

Featured image Natalia Veselnitskaya is the Russian lawyer who met with Donald Trump, Jr. at Trump Tower in June 2016. Trump, Jr. met with her because he thought she might have information damaging to Hillary Clinton. Apparently, she had none and wanted to talk instead about the Magnitsky Act, about which more later. These facts are well known to anyone who has been following the news recently. What’s less known is that »

Linda Sarsour’s call for “jihad”

Featured image Last weekend, Linda Sarsour, the radical activist who helped organize the Woman’s March against Trump in January, created a stir by talking about a jihad in the context of opposing President Trump. A careful (I hope) reading of Sarsour’s speech (which you can listen to here) shows that she did not call for violence or unlawfulness. But the speech is disturbing nonetheless. Sansour introduced “jihad” into her speech by quoting »

The merits and me

Featured image Reading the Supreme Court’s per curiam (unsigned) opinion in the Trump v. IRAP (Fourth Circuit) and Trump v. Hawaii (Ninth Circuit) “travel ban” cases today, I was struck by this. The Court unanimously stayed most of the injunctive relief granted by the lower courts in the two cases. In doing so, however, the Court doesn’t even address the usually key factor of likelihood of success on the merits. Apart from »

Supreme Court allows watered-down version of travel ban to take effect

Featured image A lot went down this morning at the Supreme Court, as was to be expected considering that this was the last day of the Court’s term. First, the Court decided to allow a limited version of President Trump’s already limited ban on travelers from six mostly Muslim countries to take effect. In technical terms, it partially stayed lower court decisions striking down the ban. The Court also agreed to decide »

Strange death of Europe

Featured image Douglas Murray (@DouglasKMurray on Twitter) is associate editor of Britain’s Spectator and a senior fellow at the Gatestone Institute. He is a prolific columnist. Gatestone has compiled his columns for the institute here. Murray’s new book is The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam. It is a book full of portents and warnings for us. Murray launched his book with a lecture at the Heritage Foundation last week posted »

Civil War on the Left, Part 41: Democrats and Immigration

Featured image Peter Beinart, a smart center-left writer once affiliated with The New Republic before it went crazy, nowadays is at The Atlantic, and he has a barn-burner of an essay out today on the subject, “How the Democrats Lost Their Way on Immigration.” It is a long article, but very much worth reading the whole thing. The point is, Beinart honestly confronts the craven partisan political calculation behind the liberal line »

Trump breaks campaign promise on “dreamers”

Featured image I don’t think we have commented yet on President Trump’s decision to continue, for now, President Obama’s amnesty program (known as DACA) for illegal immigrants who came to the United States as small children. On Thursday evening, the Trump administration announced that the so-called Dreamers will still have legal status and be able to receive work permits, renewable every two years, assuming they satisfy certain minimal conditions. On Friday, however, »