Education

The Sane vs. the Insane

Featured image Via Ann Althouse, check out this confrontation between a young woman who is a BLM activist and an older African-American man. They are standing in front of, and arguing about, the Emancipation Statue that freedmen paid for and where Frederick Douglass spoke. You don’t have to understand the words the young woman is screaming to know that you are witnessing a dialogue between a normal person and one with serious »

Does a high percentage of black arrests in schools justify kicking the police out?

Featured image Few who are paying attention will be surprised that, in Maryland public schools, black students make up a disproportionate number of those arrested by police officers working in the schools. According to the Washington Post, black students make up 56 percent of those arrested (but only 34 percent of the student population), while white students make up only 28 percent (compared to 37 percent of the student population). Eight percent »

Cancellation in the first person

Featured image In its forthcoming July/August issue, Commentary features the first-person account of our own Steve Hayward telling the story of his cancellation by the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Steve’s memoir/essay is “How I Ran Afoul of Campus Cancel Culture.” As always, Steve wears his learning lightly, but his characteristic humor is absent from this somber and infuriating account. Come for the farcically disgraceful story, stay for Steve’s »

Three approaches to reopening schools

Featured image Germany and France are set to reopen schools. However, the two nations are taking very different approaches. Germany is starting with two sets of students. Those about to move from primary school to secondary school and those about to take graduation/college entrance examinations will be the first back. Germany is still considering when other sets of students will be allowed to return. France will start with a much younger group »

Appeals court invents fundamental right to a basic minimum education

Featured image The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, in an opinion signed by a pair of judges appointed by Democratic presidents, has found that the U.S. Constitution somehow confers on citizens a fundamental right to an education that “plausibly provides access to literacy.” Judge Eric Murphy, an excellent Trump appointee, dissented. The lawsuit arises out of Detroit, Michigan. The plaintiffs are students in Detroit’s worst performing schools. They claim »

A Master Class In Education

Featured image Which state has a better public school system, Minnesota or Mississippi? If you said Minnesota, you agree with 100% of Minnesotans and probably some Mississippians, too. But it isn’t true: especially when it comes to minority students, Mississippi does a better job at a fraction of the cost. Does more money produce better schools? Learn the answer by tuning in to American Experiment Policy Fellow Catrin Wigfall’s Master Class in »

How Dumb Are America’s College Students?

Featured image Heather Mac Donald is one of America’s great heroines. For no reason other than love of her country, Western civilization and common sense, she ventures repeatedly into the bizarre and hostile world of America’s colleges and universities. If students listened to her, they would learn a lot. Alas, most of them are not up to that task. Heather has often been subjected not just to rudeness, but to threats of »

Segregation Forever!

Featured image Glenn Reynolds has an excellent column in USA Today on the re-segregation of American universities that is being forced by the Democratic Party and the Left: “Segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever!” Those words were thundered by Alabama Gov. George Wallace in his 1963 inauguration speech. But, in fact, the very next year, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act, which brought an end to segregation. Or did it? Wallace »

Liberalism Causes Achievement Gaps

Featured image This report by Chris Stewart of Brightbeam is a blockbuster. It is titled: “The Secret Shame: How America’s Most Progressive Cities Betray Their Commitment to Educational Opportunity For All.” Stewart is a liberal activist from Minnesota who undertook to find out why the Twin Cities’ left-wing public schools have some of the country’s worst achievement gaps between white and minority (black and Indian) students. Stewart compared achievement by race in »

Beat the Drum, Liberals

Featured image Kevin Drum is a left-of-center writer who is worth reading at Mother Jones. He often departs from liberal orthodoxy, as we’ve noted here in the past. To end this year, Drum offers “A Few Things Liberals Believe That They Shouldn’t.” Six, to be precise. They are: Head Start (and similar pre-K programs) raise student achievement. American health care is expensive because of private insurance. We have a retirement crisis. The »

Media/Academic Ignorance Turned up to 11

Featured image Yesterday I asked the question, derived in part from a Poynter Institute article, “Do Journalists Know Less Than They Used To?” Yes, questions with such obvious answers hardly need asking, but who knew the Washington Post would step up with an astonishing confirmation of media ignorance, with a special bonus of academic ignorance thrown in just for fun. Last week the Post ran an article by Robert C. Pianta, who »

Abolish the Ivy League?

Featured image Today’s sign of the apocalypse: Tampons Are Coming to the Men’s Room at Brown University. The student body president at Brown University, Viet Nguyen, will personally be handing out free tampons and pads in men’s, women’s, and gender neutral restrooms on campus, Newsweek reported Tuesday. “We wanted to set a tone of trans-inclusivity, and not forget that they’re an important part of the population,” Nguyen explained in an email announcing »

The war on standards, advanced courses edition

Featured image The Virginia attorney general’s office is undertaking an investigation of the Loudoun County Public Schools to determine whether the school system denies African-American students equal access to advanced programs. The investigation is a response to claims by the NAACP that Loudoun County does so. What is meant here by equal access? No particular racial group is entitled to equal participation in advanced programs. But everyone, regardless of race, has the »

Graduation rate for D.C. public schools drops 3.5 percent

Featured image In the post just below this one, John contends, all too plausibly, that the biggest threat to America’s future is our unbelievably bad public school system. Low graduation rates are not the biggest problem with our public schools, nor are they the most telling symptom of decline. They are, however, one symptom and a legitimate concern. In Washington, D.C., the graduation rate for the traditional public high schools dropped 3.5 »

The Biggest Threat to Our Future

Featured image We face a lot of threats, of course–asteroids, rogue nuclear nations, stateless terrorism, pandemics–but in my opinion, the biggest threat to America’s future is our unbelievably bad public school system. It is hard for those (like me) who went through the public schools decades ago to understand how much things have changed. Academic standards have collapsed; objective testing is out of fashion; corrupt left-wing unions have taken nearly complete control; »

Math–It’s Oppressive!

Featured image The Seattle public schools have developed a new “ethnic studies” curriculum that tells students that mathematics is a tool of oppression. Sure, some of us thought that back in junior high school, especially when we didn’t get around to doing our homework. But to have this view endorsed by the schools is remarkable. Robby Soave reports at Reason: The [Seattle public school] district has proposed a new social justice-infused curriculum »

Race and the blame game

Featured image This story from the Washington Post appears regularly these days in something like this form: The [name of county in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area] school system is well regarded. However, minority students continue to lag behind, and some parents complain that the school system isn’t doing right by their children. The latest version pertains to the Arlington, Virginia public schools. The Post reports: There is no shortage of praise »