Law Enforcement

Andrew McCarthy: Watch this

Featured image In his weekly NR column this past Saturday Andrew McCarthy decried “The turn to a pre9/11 mindset.” In part the column takes up last week’s decision (linked below) invalidating the Terrorist Screening Database. Secretly compiled by the government, the watch list subjects those listed to heightened security vetting before they are permitted to board commercial aircraft. My friend Andy writes: Judge Anthony Trenga’s watch-list decision (Elhady v. Kable) is a »

Police chiefs: Warren’s false claims are putting police officers’ lives in danger

Featured image I wrote here about Elizabeth Warren’s statement that Michael Brown was murdered by a police officer. This claim is so contrary to the facts that even the Washington Post gave it four “Pinocchios” — the most adverse rating it awards to false statements. Warren’s lie about Michael Brown is part of her campaign to disparage law enforcement. Through that campaign, she hopes to win over left-wing and African-American voters. There’s »

All the president’s men, Obama style

Featured image Today is the official publication date of my friend Andrew McCarthy’s Ball of Collusion: The Plot to Rig an Election and Destroy a Presidency. Courtesy of Encounter Books I read an advance copy of the book last week and want to recommend it enthusiastically to Power Line readers. Even though I have closely followed the “collusion” story as it has come into public view since January 2017, I was reminded »

Joe Biden: “I was a public defender. I didn’t become a prosecutor.”

Featured image Joe Biden, in responding during last week’s debate to Kamala Harris’s hard-hitting attack over his expression of pride in working with racist Senators to curb the busing of school children, said: I was a public defender. I didn’t become a prosecutor. Many viewers may have wondered what this biographical fact had to do with the debate over race. Was Biden saying that defending criminals, rather than prosecuting them, is evidence »

Loose threads in the curious case (4)

Featured image In the first part of this series I posted my correspondence with former United States Attorney for Minnesota Andrew Luger. Mr. Luger’s letter of August 22, 2016, to Omar attorney Jean Brandl played an oversize role in terminating the controversy over the curious case of Ilhan Omar. Brandl, by the way, was the Omar ally who responded on Omar’s behalf to my original inquiry to the Omar campaign in August »

Wherefore Wayfair

Featured image I take it that the government is underwriting the order of $200,000 worth of bedding and other furniture to BCFS, a nonprofit contractor that operates immigration detention facilities at the southern U.S. border. The furniture is needed to accommodate the detention of illegal aliens crossing into the United States. Current accommodations are inadequate to the task occasioned by the massive invasion with which our law enforcement authorities are attempting to »

The trial of Mohammed Noor

Featured image The long-awaited trial of former Minneapolis police office Mohammed Noor for murder begins tomorrow in Hennepin County District Court before Judge Kathryn Quaintance. In an egregious example of police incompetence, Noor killed Justine Damond on July 15, 2017. Noor should not have been on the force. His killing of Damond represents an utterly needless tragedy that exposed Minneapolis’s kakistocracy for the world to see and now, in the words of »

From the Smollett file

Featured image The CWBChicago site has posted the Chicago Police Department’s redacted investigative file in the Smollett case. Having made a freedom of information request for the file yesterday, the department responded today. That’s an extraordinarily prompt response. The file was to have been deep-sixed by now. I include CWBChicago’s links to the file records as provided in the following explanation: CWBChicago is posting the complete Chicago Police Department investigative file on »

The week that is

Featured image NBC imported the idea for the satirical news show That Was The Week That Was from the BBC in 1964. I can’t find a kinescope of the American version on YouTube, but you can come up with an episode of the British original as well as a 2006 BBC documentary about the BBC show. It’s only Wednesday a.m. and yet we already have a week overfilled with news — this »

Jussie Smollett gets sweetheart deal [UPDATED]

Featured image It’s often said that the U.S. has two criminal justice systems, one for the well-to-do and one for ordinary folks. This may be true. It certainly seems to be the case if we’re talking about well-to-do celebrities who are black and gay and hate President Trump — especially if they fall out with the law in Chicago. I’m referring, of course, to Jussie Smollett. Today, we learned that the actor »

The Border Emergency Hasn’t Gone Away

Featured image The news cycle is weird: something will be in the headlines for a while and then disappear. That doesn’t mean the problem has gone away, it just means editors and reporters have moved on to something else. Illegal immigration is like that. It is an enormous problem, imposing huge costs on taxpayers, destroying the fabric of countless American communities, straining public service resources across the country, driving down the wages »

Smollett hoax exposed

Featured image Chicago police Superintendent Eddie Johnson called a press conference this morning to announce the department’s findings in the matter of Empire actor Jussie Smollett. According to the department’s investigation, Smollett orchestrated the alleged attack on himself. And that’s not all. He also sent a threatening letter to himself at the Fox studio lot before the attack. He said Smollett was dissatisfied with his salary. “I’m left hanging my head and »

Law Enforcement: Usually Great, But Sometimes Awful

Featured image As regular readers know, I am a fan of law enforcement. I think “systemic racism” is bullshit, and police officers’ conduct is admirable, or at least defensible, in an overwhelming majority of cases. See, for example, this post and this one. I am unequivocally on the side of law enforcement. But a few cops, unfortunately, are rotten. We saw that here in Minnesota with Mohammed Noor, who shot an obviously »

Harley Feldman speaks

Featured image In December I wrote about my friend Harley Feldman’s advocacy of law enforcement use of familial DNA matching in the Power Line post “Harley Feldman’s mission revisited.” Harley’s daughter Allison Feldman was brutally murdered in 2015. Her murderer was apprehended last year through the use of familial DNA long after the case had gone cold. Harley was interviewed by Julie Rose on the January 22 edition of BYU Radio’s Top »

Is it something he said?

Featured image The Daily Caller’s Richard Pollock has an exclusive report on an FBI raid. When I say FBI raid, I mean FBI raid. It involved some 16 agents making a house call on whistleblower Dennis Nathan Cain. The problem here seems to be that Cain is blowing the whistle on federal law enforcement (or the nonfeasance thereof) in matters pertaining to the Clinton crime family. As if that weren’t enough, Robert »

Fear & loathing at the DoJ: Finale

Featured image In the memoir Cardiac Arrest: Five Heart-Stopping Years as a CEO on the Feds’ Hit List (written with Stephen Saltarelli), Howard Root tells the story of his experience as chief executive officer of Vascular Solutions caught in the crosshairs of the federal government when prosecutors sought to put his company out of business and to send him to the big house. Howard touched on one aspect of his story in »

The Minneapolis follies

Featured image We have closely followed the killing of Justine Damond by Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor on July 15 last year. The case has received international attention and justly so. Noor has now been charged homicide and manslaughter charges here in state court. Noor is also the defendant in a civil lawsuit brought by Justine’s family here in federal court. I wrote recently about the federal lawsuit in “Notes on the »