Latest Hillary Emails Raise Questions About Corruption, China

Featured image Judicial Watch released another set of Hillary Clinton’s State Department emails today; these are slowly being produced in response to one or more court orders. You can download some of them here. Two email threads are particularly interesting, both relating to China. This is the first thread, dated September 2010. Click to enlarge: Doug Band was a key adviser to Bill Clinton who represented the Clinton Foundation. Huma Abedin asked »

Why wouldn’t China insult Obama?

Featured image Scott has described the reception President Obama received when he arrived in China. It was, as the New York Times acknowledged, “bruising even by Chinese standards.” It was also unsurprising, Susan Rice’s statement that “they did things that weren’t anticipated” notwithstanding. Obama has earned China’s contempt. The administration’s “pivot to Asia” was not, objectively, terribly meaningful. But to the extent it had meaning, the Chinese reasonably perceived it as an »

Was it something he said?

Featured image The Chinese government found a new way to express its contempt for Barack Obama and the United States yesterday. The authorities snubbed Obama upon his arrival in Hangzhou before the start of the G20 conference. According to the Guardian: “[Obama] was forced to disembark from Air Force One through a little-used exit in the plane’s belly after no rolling staircase was provided when he landed in the eastern Chinese city »

The China Question

Featured image As we periodically ponder what is going on with China’s slowing economy, it might be worth stepping back to take in a more fundamental question. China’s fabulous growth over the last 25 years appears to call into question a favorite thesis of free marketeers such as Milton Friedman, namely, that in the long run you can’t have free markets and undemocratic government. You can for a while—think Chile in the »

The Economy: Don’t Look Now, But. . .

Featured image So the stock market fell 1,000 points last week, the worst first week performance of the stock market ever. This occurs amidst a decent jobs report on Friday, though as many observers noted that a lot of the jobs were on the lower end of the skill level, and several news outlets noted that wages continue to be stagnant. Everyone is pointing to China, whose economy is possibly slipping by »

China Lies, Tom Friedman Hardest Hit

Featured image Further to our item yesterday about how China has consistently underreported its coal use and carbon dioxide emissions, a sharp-eyed reader reminds me of this 2009 Tom Friedman column, expressing his prototypical “China-Is-Awesome” envy of authoritarianism: One-party autocracy certainly has its drawbacks. But when it is led by a reasonably enlightened group of people, as China is today, it can also have great advantages. That one party can just impose »

#Climatefail, China Edition

Featured image Remember a while back when Obama came back from China with a bilateral climate agreement in which China would cap its greenhouse gas emissions by . . . 2030? Never mind that China’s GHG emissions would double during that period—such is the desperation of the climatistas for glittering pieces of paper that they gushed about how the planet was now saved, because China is finally on board! The New York »

China Reverses Course: Malthus, Ehrlich, and McKibben Hardest Hit

Featured image China announced today that it is ending its coercive one-child policy, and will now allow couples to have two children. That’s mighty white of them. Don’t get your hopes up that this represents a turn toward more respect for fundamental human rights by China’s ruling Communist Party. The change is being made for simple demographic reasons: China is getting old very rapidly, and like other social democracies it needs a »

Don’t Look Now, But. . .

Featured image We’ve been periodically taking note of China’s wavering economy (here in July for instance), and speculated about how things would get interesting if they started dumping their large holdings of U.S. debt. Well: Once the Biggest Buyer, China Starts Dumping U.S. Government Debt Central banks around the world are selling U.S. government bonds at the fastest pace on record, the most dramatic shift in the $12.8 trillion Treasury market since »

Obama gives Pope Francis the finger

Featured image President Obama has decided that his invited guests for the arrival of Pope Francis next week will include transgender activists, the first openly gay Episcopal bishop, and a nun who criticizes church policies on abortion and euthanasia. The Vatican has objected. It notes that photos taken with the pope might be used to suggest his endorsement of activities he does not approve. I’m no fan of this pope. Thus, I’m »

Russia and China Are Using Hacked Data to Identify and Neutralize U.S. Agents

Featured image This is one of the great scandals of the Obama administration–really, of the post-war era. But our Democratic Party media, fearful of what may be coming in next year’s presidential election, have consistently downplayed it. The Los Angeles Times reports: “Foreign spies use hacked data to identify U.S. intelligence agents.” Foreign spy services, especially in China and Russia, are aggressively aggregating and cross-indexing hacked U.S. computer databases — including security »

A hack hacked (and fired)

Featured image Twitchy captures a classic 2012 tweet of Obama OPM Director Katherine Archuleta, the nominal leader of an agency that has now been the victim of two Pearl Harbor-size hacks by President Obama’s Chinese friends. Archuleta’s tweet is the digital equivalent of an exploding cigar. Twitchy comments: Today’s a busy day for those pointing and laughing at the people who mocked presidential candidate Mitt Romney over his warnings about Chinese hackers »

Don’t Look Now But . . . China?

Featured image While everyone was getting on his Great American Barbecue yesterday for the July 4th holiday and awaiting the Greek referendum today, the Chinese stock market was crashing again. It’s down 12 percent over the last week, almost 30 percent in the last month. Tyler Cowen is on it, with a simple message: Greece is small; China is large. Uh oh. From behind the FT’s paywall: The Shanghai index is firmly »

Is the U.S. Lousy at Cyber Warfare?

Featured image A series of alarming data breaches over the last two years have cast doubt on our government’s competence with regard to cyber warfare. Glenn Reynolds writes about the most recent instance in USA Today: “Hackers linked to China have gained access to the sensitive background information submitted by intelligence and military personnel for security clearances, U.S. officials said Friday, describing a cyberbreach of federal records dramatically worse than first acknowledged.” »

Massive Government Data Breach Exposes Information on Four Million Americans

Featured image Chinese hackers have invaded computers at the federal Office of Personnel Management, accessing personal information relating to at least four million current and former government employees. The New York Times reports: The Obama administration on Thursday announced what appeared to be one of the largest breaches of federal employees’ data, involving at least four million current and former government workers in an intrusion that officials said apparently originated in China. »

The Nork nuke angle

Featured image Omri Ceren promises a report on House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on Iran yesterday, with attention to the $50 billion signing bonus President Obama has in store for acquiring the signature of the Supreme Leader’s representatives on the arrangement in process with Iran. The $50 billion will come in handy as the Iranians finance their nuclear program and support their good works in Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, Yemen and elsewhere in »

It’s Not Your Father’s Vietnam

Featured image I have a good friend who is a venture capitalist and travels frequently to Asia. We had lunch together a week or two ago, when he had just returned from a trip to Indonesia, Hong Kong, China and Vietnam. What he wanted to talk about was Vietnam. He is excited about its prospects: the population is remarkably young (unlike China’s and Japan’s) and the country is wide open to development, »