Modest Proposals On Gun Violence

Featured image White House spokesman Josh Earnest was asked several questions about gun control during his press briefing today. Breitbart summarizes his responses, which were more of the same: endless references to “common sense” reforms which are never specified. Earnest wants to keep firearms out of the hands of “criminals and others who shouldn’t have them”; so do we all, but how? To state the blindingly obvious, mass murder is, and always »

Mike Lee’s bogus conservative case for criminal justice reform

Featured image Senator Mike Lee takes to the pages of the Washington Examiner to make what he calls the conservative case for criminal justice reform. The criminal justice reform Sen. Lee has in mind is the softer sentencing and release of many criminals called for by the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015 (SRCA), of which he is a sponsor. Lee’s case for such reform turns out not to be conservative »

Bipartisan sentencing reform proposal would free gun-carrying felons

Featured image As John noted, President Obama barely waited for the blood to dry in Oregon before seizing on the mass shooting at a community college to call for “common sense gun safety laws.” Ironically, at just about the same time a bipartisan group of Senators was introducing criminal sentencing reform legislation that would cause the release from jail of criminals who carried guns while committing drug felonies. As Bill Otis explains, »

Demand hearings on the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015

Featured image Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, calls the newly introduced Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015 (SRCA) “a landmark piece of legislation.” Julie Stewart, the president of an anti-mandatory minimums organization, calls it, correctly, “the most significant sentencing reform legislation in a generation.” So when do the hearings on this momentous act begin? Never, it appears — unless the demand for them becomes irresistible. As I noted »

It’s Time to Stop Feeding the Delusions of Mass Murderers

Featured image Last night I wrote that the most effective measure to reduce the number of mass shootings would be to stop publicizing the names and purported grievances of perpetrators. The principal motivation of these deranged criminals is to become famous–as they see it, to go down in history. The Umpqua Community College murderer confirmed this once again when he wrote, prior to his rampage, “The more people you kill, the more »

Bipartisan sentencing reform introduced; career prosecutors denounce it

Featured image Today, as expected, a bipartisan collection of Senators introduced sentencing reform legislation. The nine Senators sponsoring the legislation are: Grassley, Graham, Cornyn, and Lee on the Republican side and a rogue’s gallery of Democrats — Leahy, Durbin, Schumer, Whitehouse, and Booker. The last of these Democrats, a teller of tale tales, is credited with much of the work. The legislation could have been worse, but it isn’t worthy of passage »

Democrats face potential crack-up over crime; Republicans shouldn’t bail them out

Featured image Yesterday, I discussed the possibility that the Democratic party may experience a crack-up as a result of slavish adherence to the demands of environmentalists, backed by the party’s upscale, elitist wing. The hard-left environmentalist agenda is likely to alienate members of the working class, a traditional Democratic constituency. We may be seeing the beginning of this process with the dispute over the Keystone XLpipeline. The modern Democratic party depends not »

Are Democrats partially responsible for America’s heroin epidemic?

Featured image Hector Garza, president of the Laredo, Texas chapter of the National Border Patrol Council, contends that illegal immigrants crossing the border are bringing heroin into this country as a matter of routine. Every illegal alien who crosses the border between the U.S. and Mexico does so for a fee, and often the price is carrying a backpack full of heroin, Garza says. Department of Homeland Security officials take basically the »

Don’t blame Louie Gohmert for Clinton’s destruction of documents

Featured image Attempting to defend Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email system, James Carville said, “I suspect she didn’t want [Congressman] Louie Gohmert riffling through her e-mails, which seems to me to be a kind of reasonable position for someone to take.” Reasonable, as Shannen Coffin says, only if she was not too concerned with complying with the law. But Clinton’s penchant for making sure that her records can’t be reviewed »

The Clinton tornado claims another victim

Featured image A friend who has been closely following Hillary Clinton’s career for years writes: Add Bryan Pagliano to the list of Clinton “friends” who are left to clean up the mess made by the Tom and Daisy Buchanan of American politics. At least Pagliano is still alive. Other “friends” include: Jim McDougal (Clintons’ business partner; convicted felon who died in prison), Susan McDougal (Clintons’ business partner; convicted felon), Vince Foster (avoided »

“We Need To Start Killing These Officers”

Featured image In Madison, Wisconsin, a mob attacked a police officer who was trying to break up a fight: The officer stopped in the area of Prairie Road and Jacobs Way around 6:20 p.m. after spotting a large number of people in the street. He said that as he approached he saw a woman punch a man in the face, and he could see that the woman had a can of pepper »

Why did Hillary’s staffer plead the Fifth?

Featured image As John noted yesterday, Bryan Pagliano, the Hillary Clinton staffer who worked on her campaign in 2008 and set up her private email server in 2009, will plead the Fifth Amendment in response to a Congressional subpoena. To the casual observer, this might seem odd. Pagliano didn’t send or receive information on the server, nor did he conceal or destroy any records. What crime might he have committed? Shannen Coffin »

Washington Post offers glimpses of Hillary’s legal jeopardy

Featured image The Washington Post reported today about the latest batch of classified emails found on Hillary Clinton’s private server. The story appears at page 5 of the print edition. The piece by Carol Leonig and Rosalind Helderman is reasonably informative and not particularly biased. (The headline in the print edition is “Clinton wrote, sent classified emails on private server;” the online edition offers a more pro-Clinton spin: “Clinton, using private server, »

Clinton emails contained top secret info derived from satellite spying on North Korean nukes

Featured image The latest batch of classified emails on Hillary Clinton’s private server includes information that may well be sufficient to establish that she violated 18 U.S.C. Section 793. However, as I mentioned here, we already knew that “top secret” information on her server derived from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, which performs aerial surveillance, had triggered FBI concern in the first place. Even without knowing what, specifically, the information pertained to, it »

Did Hillary violate the law against disclosing defense information? A preliminary analysis

Featured image Last night, I suggested that, pending a review of the just-released batch of emails from Hillary Clinton’s server, we should contemplate a section of the U.S. Code that Clinton may have violated — 18 U.S.C. Section 793(f). 24 hours after the release of these emails, we can now contemplate (but not reach firm conclusions as to) how Clinton’s conduct stacks up against Section 793(f). First, let’s again examine the statutory »

Is It 1968 Again? Crime Rising “Unexpectedly”

Featured image The Wall Street Journal’s political correspondent Gerald Seib writes today that this presidential campaign cycle resembles 1968, with Trump filling the George Wallace role and Bernie Sanders the Gene McCarthy role. Maybe, but one parallel he left out is the crime rate, which was a central issue in 1968, and which may well be by election day next year. Have you noticed that crime is “unexpectedly” rising fast after two »

Accused Texas police murderer avoided jail time for felony assault in 2012

Featured image I wrote yesterday about the criminal history of Shannon Miles, the man accused of executing Deputy Darren Goforth in Texas last week. Miles, I noted, had been convicted within the past ten years of resisting arrest, trespassing, evading detention, and disorderly conduct with a firearm. The most recent conviction was in 2009 for resisting arrest. Local authorities have stated that Miles’ record included violent acts towards law enforcement officials. Yet »