House of Representatives

Nunes approaches the target (2)

Featured image What is the true origin of the counterintelligence investigation that has culminated in the appointment of Robert Mueller as Special Counsel? Signs point to former CIA Director John Brennan — he was certainly in the mix — who has been on a verbal rampage roughly coincident with the inauguration of President Trump. His most recent effusion on Twitter shows him in characteristic form (below). If he had any friends, someone »

Nunes approaches the target

Featured image House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes appeared for an interview with Maria Bartiromo on the Fox News Sunday Morning Futures program. I’m posting it below for Nunes’s discussion of the documents he has been seeking from the Department of Justice/FBI concerning the true origin of the counterintelligence investigation that has culminated in the Mueller Switch Project. It contrasts markedly with the comments of Jake Tapper and Senator Mark Warner in »

An FBI informant in the Trump campaign? (2)

Featured image In her weekly Wall Street Journal column Kim Strassel delivers news and analysis you probably won’t see much of elsewhere. Following up on her own previous work that we noted here yesterday, Kim reports: The Department of Justice lost its latest battle with Congress Thursday when it allowed House Intelligence Committee members to view classified documents about a top-secret intelligence source that was part of the FBI’s investigation of the »

An FBI informant in the Trump campaign?

Featured image Rush Limbaugh summarizes Kim Strassel’s Wall Street Journal column of this past Friday, today’s Wall Street Journal editorial (obviously written by Kim), and a related Washington Post story in which the deep state strikes back against House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes. It’s a complicated story to unravel. In the transcript posted at his site, Rush links to each of the three sources and summarizes the salient details. Close reading »

Mysteries of the probe (2)

Featured image In his National Review column “Outrageous redactions to the Russia report,” Andrew McCarthy looks at the now unredacted portions of the House Intelligence Committee report that we posted here on Friday night. About those now unredacted redactions graciously approved by the FBI: “[W]hat we find out is that they were concealing their own questionable judgments and conflicting explanations for their actions; their use of foreign-intelligence and criminal-investigative authorities to investigate »

Leftist House Chaplain keeps job, as Ryan backs down

Featured image When Speaker Paul Ryan fired Rev. Patrick Conway from his job as Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives, critics of the decision argued that Ryan made the decision because Conway is Catholic. Conway himself reportedly took that position in a complaint against the Speaker’s office. The claim is absurd. Ryan himself is Catholic. A more plausible charge is that Ryan fired Conway because of his theology. Conway is a »

Comey less redacted

Featured image In traditional scandal management style, a less redacted portion of the House Intelligence Committee report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election (posted here by Chairman Nunes, embedded below via Scribd) escaped the bureaucracy late yesterday afternoon as we headed into the weekend. Byron York’s story on this version of the report is time-stamped 5:49 p.m. The Federalist’s Sean Davis has posted before and after looks at the report »

Voters want to “drain swamp,” don’t trust GOP to do it

Featured image “Drain The Swamp” was an important rallying cry of the Trump campaign. But does it still resonate a year-and-a-half after the 2016 election? It does. So finds a poll commissioned by Ear to the Ground and conducted by McLaughlin & Associates. The poll (of 1,000 likely voters) found that 55 percent of Americans are “concerned” or “very concerned” about “the Swamp,” with 36 percent very concerned. 59 percent of those »

Redacted (2)

Featured image The House Intelligence Committee report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election was heavily redacted by the “Intelligence Community” before its release to the public on Friday. I posted the report as released here. In his contemporaneous press release, Chairman Devin Nunes expressed his displeasure with the redactions: “Given the substantial public interest at stake, the Committee is publishing the redacted version we’ve received. However, we object to the »

Redacted

Featured image We have highlighted the revelation of the House Intelligence Committee report that former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper leaked the Steele Dossier to Jake Tapper/CNN, lied about it to the committee, and then went on the CNN payroll to continue the anti-Trump hatefest. At the Weekly Standard, Eric Felten sketches out the ramifications of Clapper’s treachery. Based on his reading of the Comey memos, Felten speculates reasonably that it »

The House Intel Committee report

Featured image The House Intelligence Committee has just released the redacted version of its 130-page report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. While it finds Russian interference, it finds that President Trump did not collude with the Russians to promote his election. The report includes an introduction and overview, a summary of table of findings, and a summary table of recommendations. Appendices add another 100 pages to the report. I »

Waiting for the Comey memos

Featured image At the Daily Caller, Chuck Ross reports that Republican chairmen of three House committees have demanded that the Department of Justice provide copies of the memos written by former FBI Director James Comey following his meetings with President Trump. “There is no legal basis for withholding these materials from Congress,” according to the letter by Reps. Bob Goodlatte, Trey Gowdy, and Devin Nunes sent to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein »

What is the FBI hiding? (5)

Featured image In this series we have followed the FBI’s withholding of an unredacted version of the Electronic Communication (“EC”) that initiated the FBI counterintelligence investigation culminating in the Mueller project. Around the time I wrote part 4 of the series yesterday, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein finally gave House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes and Rep. Trey Gowdy a look at a less redacted or minimally redacted copy of the document. »

Paul Ryan and beyond

Featured image Speaker Paul Ryan will be stepping down. He will not seek re-election to the House. I like and admire Ryan, but believe he’s been a disappointment as Speaker. His signature issue was always entitlement reform/fiscal responsibility. Ryan was never likely to get entitlement reform. However, he might at least have avoided the gross fiscal irresponsibility of the omnibus bill that Congress recently passed and the president signed. Alternatively, and preferably, »

What is the FBI hiding? (4)

Featured image House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes has sought an unredacted copy of the Electronic Communication (“EC,” in intelligence jargon) that opened the counterintelligence investigation leading to surveillance of the Trump campaign and culminating in the Mueller project. The document has been under subpoena for months. In previous parts of this series — part 1, part 2, and part 3 — I have posted correspondence and comments bearing on the FBI’s »

What is the FBI hiding? (3)

Featured image In a letter dated April 4, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes demanded that the FBI and Department of Justice produce an unredacted copy of the electronic communication (“EC”) that initiated the “collusion” counterintelligence investigation culminating in the Mueller madness. The Department of Justice and FBI responded in a letter stamped April 6 and signed by Prim Escalona for Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd. I posted Rep. Nunes’s letter in »

What is the FBI hiding? (2)

Featured image The FBI has responded to the letter from House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes that I posted here yesterday. In a self-advertised act of magnanimity to Congress, the Department of Justice and the FBI will make an “extraordinary accommodation” to the committee by allowing its members access to Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act applications and renewals. It’s very big of them. However, there are limits. With respect to Nunes’s specific demand »