Law Enforcement

Menendez alleges Justice Department lied to grand jury in his case

Featured image Sen. Robert Menendez’s defense team has leveled what look like substantial allegations of misconduct against the Justice Department, which is prosecuting him for alleged corruption. According to the Washington Post, Menendez claims, based on internal FBI documents, that the lead DOJ prosecutor in his case allowed an FBI agent falsely to testify to the grand jury that it was “perfectly clear” that in meetings with top DHS officials, Menendez sought »

The deep meaning of San Francisco

Featured image In one phase the modern novel takes up the idea of expressive form. James Joyce took it about as far as possible in Ulysses, with the style of each chapter varying to mirror the content. In the “Aeolus” chapter placed inside a newspaper office, for example, Joyce exhausted the variety of rhetorical devices available in English to capture windbaggery in action. The city of San Francisco now presents as a »

Stephen Hunter: The case of Tamir Rice

Featured image We first got to know Stephen Hunter when he was the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post movie critic. He is best known as a successful novelist, and he happens to know a great deal about guns. I, Ripper is his new novel. Published last month, it is in bookstores now. Here he offers his reflections on the case of Tamir Rice on the occasion of a Cleveland judge sounding off on »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (finale)

Featured image A brief look back at where we have been in this series. If you missed any of its ten parts, I hope you will take a quick look. I would like to point out in particular the post on Michelle Alexander (part 4), which I believe makes a contribution to the subject with a lot of help from the Manhattan Institute’s Heather Mac Donald. Part 1: “Here I set forth »

Things go from bad to worse for Marilyn Mosby

Featured image Marilyn Mosby, the prosecutor in the Freddie Gray case, continues to make news for all the wrong reasons. First, her motion for a gag order in the case was dismissed because she filed it in the wrong court. The Baltimore Sun reports: Judge Charles J. Peters ruled the motion lacked standing in an actual proceeding, as it was filed by Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby’s office in Circuit Court on »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (9)

Featured image James Scanlan is a Washington attorney specializing in the use of statistics with respect to employment discrimination litigation and compliance. He has forwarded a copy of the letter he has submitted to Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges and Chief of Police Janeé Harteau regarding the recent American Civil Liberties Union Minnesota study of the racial impact of Minneapolis policing practices. I have referred to the ACLU study at several points in »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (8)

Featured image Heather Mac Donald has turned herself into an invaluable national resource on matters of crime and policing. She has written important essays such as her recent Wall Street Journal column headlined somewhat inaccurately “The new nationwide crime wave.” The Manhattan Institute has collected some of her newspaper columns, magazine essays, podcasts, videos, and congressional testimony here, and Mac Donald herself has collected several of her important essays, mostly written for »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (7)

Featured image I have sought in this series to provide a background of relevant facts within which to understand the welter of stories featuring race and law enforcement over the past nine months. This past week the Star Tribune’s Eric Roper delivered another such story, this one with a local angle, in “Push is on for more policing reforms in Minneapolis.” For relevant background to Roper’s story, please see John Hinderaker’s post »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (4)

Featured image If you’re trying to get a handle on the race-based assault on law enforcement, unfortunately, you must acquaint yourself with Michelle Alexander and The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.. Published in paperback in 2012, the book is now in its eighteenth printing with a new foreword by Cornel West. In his foreword, West declares it “the secular bible for a new social movement.” This he »

FBI Should Come Clean on Surveillance Aircraft

Featured image Here in the Twin Cities, it started when a man described as an aviation buff noticed a small airplane acting oddly. The Minneapolis Star Tribune reported on May 29: Aviation buff John Zimmerman was at a weekly gathering of neighbors Friday night when he noticed something peculiar: a small plane circling a route overhead that didn’t make sense to him. It was dark, so a sightseeing flight didn’t make sense, »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (2)

Featured image A few years back I had a close encounter with the guy who helped create the firestorm over alleged racial profiling in traffic stops. It came as the result of an invitation extended to me in 2002 by Minnesota Civil Liberties Union executive director Chuck Samuelson to debate the guy. The MCLU is the Minnesota chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. For a long time the ACLU has constituted »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (1)

Featured image The current assault on the criminal justice system has taken the form of an assault on local law enforcement as racist. Who speaks for the police? Not many. The task has apparently fallen to Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, profiled recently by Charles Cooke in the NR cover story “The sheriff as rebel.” Inundated as we are by a farrago of politically inspired falsehood and hysteria, it may be useful »

The Wages of Liberalism Is Death

Featured image The Left’s ceaseless attacks on law enforcement are having the predictable effect: elevated homicide rates in the cities where policemen have come under attack. Paul wrote here about out-of-control violence in Baltimore in the wake of the anti-police protests there, and the indictment of six officers. Baltimore’s CBS outlet updated the numbers yesterday: It’s the deadliest month Baltimore has seen in more than 15 years. More than two dozen shootings »

Notes on “Days of Rage” (2)

Featured image Reading Bryan Burrough’s book Days of Rage from cover to cover over the weekend, I flipped over the book. In this post I continue to jot notes on the book to amplify the attention it has received so far. Part 1 is posted here; our interview with Bryan Burrough, recorded on Tuesday, is posted here. • Burrough tells the story of six terrorist groups that conducted campaigns of “revolutionary violence,” »

Eric Holder’s unpersuasive attack on the Ferguson police department, Part Two

Featured image The Department of Justice’s angry condemnation of the Ferguson police department asserts systemic racism in the enforcement of certain laws. I argued here that the DOJ’s report fails to show such racism, though it may exist. But the DOJ’s report takes its criticism even further. It is concerned that even the facially neutral application of certain laws by the Ferguson justice system is discriminatory because of the impact on African-Americans. »

Eric Holder’s unpersuasive attack on the Ferguson police department, Part One

Featured image Last week, the Justice Department announced, with little fanfare, that Darren Wilson was justified in shooting Michael Brown. The Department found “no credible evidence” that Brown was attempting to surrender when Wilson shot him. So much for “Hands up, don’t shoot.” It made for good theater, but it was a lie. Also last week, the Justice Department, with much fanfare, announced that the Ferguson police department for which Darren Wilson »

Jeffrey Sterling convicted; his accomplice remains free

Featured image Jeffrey Sterling, a former Central Intelligence Agency officer, was convicted of espionage today. He was charged with telling a journalist about a secret operation to disrupt Iran’s nuclear program. The journalist was James Risen of the New York Times. Scott has written extensively about this case, focusing on Risen’s disclosure of Sterling’s secrets and the government’s unwillingness to require the journalist to testify in the case. Fortunately, Sterling was convicted »