Law Enforcement

Deep secrets of racial profiling (7)

Featured image I have sought in this series to provide a background of relevant facts within which to understand the welter of stories featuring race and law enforcement over the past nine months. This past week the Star Tribune’s Eric Roper delivered another such story, this one with a local angle, in “Push is on for more policing reforms in Minneapolis.” For relevant background to Roper’s story, please see John Hinderaker’s post »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (4)

Featured image If you’re trying to get a handle on the race-based assault on law enforcement, unfortunately, you must acquaint yourself with Michelle Alexander and The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.. Published in paperback in 2012, the book is now in its eighteenth printing with a new foreword by Cornel West. In his foreword, West declares it “the secular bible for a new social movement.” This he »

FBI Should Come Clean on Surveillance Aircraft

Featured image Here in the Twin Cities, it started when a man described as an aviation buff noticed a small airplane acting oddly. The Minneapolis Star Tribune reported on May 29: Aviation buff John Zimmerman was at a weekly gathering of neighbors Friday night when he noticed something peculiar: a small plane circling a route overhead that didn’t make sense to him. It was dark, so a sightseeing flight didn’t make sense, »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (2)

Featured image A few years back I had a close encounter with the guy who helped create the firestorm over alleged racial profiling in traffic stops. It came as the result of an invitation extended to me in 2002 by Minnesota Civil Liberties Union executive director Chuck Samuelson to debate the guy. The MCLU is the Minnesota chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. For a long time the ACLU has constituted »

Deep secrets of racial profiling (1)

Featured image The current assault on the criminal justice system has taken the form of an assault on local law enforcement as racist. Who speaks for the police? Not many. The task has apparently fallen to Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, profiled recently by Charles Cooke in the NR cover story “The sheriff as rebel.” Inundated as we are by a farrago of politically inspired falsehood and hysteria, it may be useful »

The Wages of Liberalism Is Death

Featured image The Left’s ceaseless attacks on law enforcement are having the predictable effect: elevated homicide rates in the cities where policemen have come under attack. Paul wrote here about out-of-control violence in Baltimore in the wake of the anti-police protests there, and the indictment of six officers. Baltimore’s CBS outlet updated the numbers yesterday: It’s the deadliest month Baltimore has seen in more than 15 years. More than two dozen shootings »

Notes on “Days of Rage” (2)

Featured image Reading Bryan Burrough’s book Days of Rage from cover to cover over the weekend, I flipped over the book. In this post I continue to jot notes on the book to amplify the attention it has received so far. Part 1 is posted here; our interview with Bryan Burrough, recorded on Tuesday, is posted here. • Burrough tells the story of six terrorist groups that conducted campaigns of “revolutionary violence,” »

Eric Holder’s unpersuasive attack on the Ferguson police department, Part Two

Featured image The Department of Justice’s angry condemnation of the Ferguson police department asserts systemic racism in the enforcement of certain laws. I argued here that the DOJ’s report fails to show such racism, though it may exist. But the DOJ’s report takes its criticism even further. It is concerned that even the facially neutral application of certain laws by the Ferguson justice system is discriminatory because of the impact on African-Americans. »

Eric Holder’s unpersuasive attack on the Ferguson police department, Part One

Featured image Last week, the Justice Department announced, with little fanfare, that Darren Wilson was justified in shooting Michael Brown. The Department found “no credible evidence” that Brown was attempting to surrender when Wilson shot him. So much for “Hands up, don’t shoot.” It made for good theater, but it was a lie. Also last week, the Justice Department, with much fanfare, announced that the Ferguson police department for which Darren Wilson »

Jeffrey Sterling convicted; his accomplice remains free

Featured image Jeffrey Sterling, a former Central Intelligence Agency officer, was convicted of espionage today. He was charged with telling a journalist about a secret operation to disrupt Iran’s nuclear program. The journalist was James Risen of the New York Times. Scott has written extensively about this case, focusing on Risen’s disclosure of Sterling’s secrets and the government’s unwillingness to require the journalist to testify in the case. Fortunately, Sterling was convicted »

At the Sterling trial

Featured image Last week the government commenced its prosecution of former CIA official Jeffrey Sterling for violation of the Espionage Act. The government alleges that Sterling leaked the details of a program intended to undermine Iran’s nuclear program to New York Times reporter James Risen. The program was subject to a security classification indicating its extreme sensitivity. Sterling did not publicly disclose the details of the CIA program; he laundered them through »

Risen rules

Featured image New York Times reporter James Risen was subpoenaed to testify in the prosecution of CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling. Sterling is under prosecution for blowing a CIA program intended to undermine Iran’s nuclear program. The program was subject to a security classification indicating its extreme sensitivity. To no discernible public good, Risen publicized the program in his book State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration. »

Clarke clobber caper

Featured image I was surprised, to put it mildly, to hear Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke disparaging Mayor de Blasio and President Obama and Obma pal Al Sharpton last week when I happened to catch Clarke’s post-Christmas appearance live on cable news. It’s not that Sheriff Clarke hasn’t distinguished himself as a voice of truth and reason on matters of race and law enforcement. It’s that he was saying these things on »

Giuliani explains, part 2

Featured image The Washington Post found Rudy Giuliani guilty of telling a whopper when he stated recently: “We’ve had four months of propaganda, starting with the president, that everybody should hate the police.” On Face the Nation this morning, Major Garrett asked Giuliani if he wanted to retract his statement in light of the Washington’s Post’s verdict. In the video below, Giuliani not only declined; he explored the relevance of Obama’s go-to »

Giuliani explains

Featured image Erin Burnett invited Rudy Giuliani to appear on CNN last week immediately following Giuliani’s visit to the grieving families of NYPD Officers Ramos and Liu. Breitbart posted the video below along with a transcript of the interview here. Burnett devoted the first question and perhaps 30 seconds to the murder of the two officers. After that she couldn’t wait to introduce yet one more statistic designed to create the impression »

A word from Jason Riley

Featured image Jason Riley is a member of the Wall Street Journal editorial board and author of Please Stop Helping Us. He has powerfully condemned the disgusting currents of disgrace and dishonesty running through the Obama administration’s war on law enforcement. The video below (transcript here) captures him in outstanding form on the FOX News Special Report panel this week. Will somebody say amen? Via Jason Riley’s Twitter feed. »

To stand with the police

Featured image President Obama is dispatching Vice President Biden to attend the funeral of murdered NYPD Officer Rafael Ramos this weekend. Officer Ramos leaves a wife and teenage sons behind. Jaden Ramos is the younger of the two sons. On Sunday he took to Facebook to post a distraught message declaring it the worst day of his life. He subsequently added: Today I had to say bye to my father. He was »