Food and Wine

The Story Behind the Roto-Broil 400

Featured image Burnt Toast is a podcast about food. I normally wouldn’t hear it, but my wife urged me to listen to this episode. Burnt Toast had done a podcast on the Roto-Broil 400, one of the premier kitchen devices of the early 1960s. The Roto-Broil remains a cult item that is still in use in some homes. After that podcast, the producer received a message that led to a follow-up, which »

How to Fight Fake News and the Deep State

Featured image Some Power Line readers, especially the ones who follow my gratuitous and indulgent Facebook photos of grilling extravaganzas, think I should offer some cooking posts here. So why not. Living well is the best revenge. Especially if it involves: red meat, red wine, and a turbocharged carbon footprint. It’s the recommended way to combat fake news and the deep state. Besides, I’ve been working all weekend on a long overdue »

And in Other “Settled Science”

Featured image A recent book on Alcohol and Aging offers this very important chapter abstract: Epidemiological studies have observed that older adults who consume light to moderate amounts of alcohol have higher cognitive functioning and are less likely to develop different types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, compared to older adults who do not consume alcohol. Similar findings have been reported by studies that have examined midlife alcohol consumption and cognitive functioning »

And Now for Something Completely Different: Stop Whining, Drink Wine!

Featured image We’ve long known that red wine reduces the risk of heart attacks and several other ailments, which is why daily consumption of red wine is part of my health regimen. But did you know wine also makes you smarter? It’s settled science! At least according to a new book, Neuroenology: How the Brain Creates the Taste of Wine, by Gordon Shepherd. Mike Meisner of Napa Valley’s Last Bottle Bar summarizes »

Loose Ends (14)

Featured image Heavily overscheduled road trip this week, hence the scarcity of posts the last couple of days. Collecting lots of scraps of gossip in DC about the Trump transition, most of it wrong, I suspect. At least I was able to sneak in a fine bottle of Bordeaux at an undisclosed location last night. Some items from the spindle: • What’s the old line about stepping out of the way when »

Whiskey and Freedom!

Featured image Our friends at the Competitive Enterprise Institute have just this morning released a new seven-minute film, “I, Whiskey,” in which they remind us of the valuable principle that “the story of whiskey is the story of freedom. . . the classic American story.” Hear, hear. (The title is an obvious homage to the previous short film CEI produced of the classic Leonard Read essay, “I, Pencil.” Also worth a watch »

Today’s Silly Regulatory Diktat from Obama

Featured image News out today is that the Obama FDA is issuing new guidelines on salt in food, hoping to pressure the food industry. Okay, maybe we eat too much salt (says me, who is currently about to braise porks ribs for dinner after letting them set all night in my fridge in a yummy salt-based rub), but does the Obama Administration have to make everything so ripe for parody? FDA commissioner »

Meat-Eater’s Manifesto

Featured image I enjoy reminding people that I’m actually a vegan. I just allow the cow to do the work first. This is a nice piece of work piercing the pretensions of Veganism. I especially like “I could never eat plants that are raised on crowded farms and inhumane living conditions with less than one square inch of space per stalk, stuck in the soil against their will.” (About 3 minutes long.) »

The Height of Low Kitsch

Featured image I’ve been wanting to get this story planted somewhere for a long time. Tomorrow’s Wall Street Journal A-hed story: Fans Rally Around ‘That Painting,’ A Symbol of Las Vegas Kitsch By Alexandra Berzon LAS VEGAS—People here can no longer marvel at the public display of one million dollars, be dazzled by “the world’s largest rhinestone” or even watch showgirls prance in ostrich-feather headdresses. All have vanished. But when a reality-television »

A Neglected Issue

Featured image I somehow missed the Washington Post Wonkblog story two years ago about the mal-distribution of alcohol consumption in this country, but here’s the gist of it: The top 10 percent of drinkers account for well over half of the alcohol consumed in any given year. On the other hand, people in the bottom three deciles don’t drink at all, and even the median consumption among those who do drink is just three »

Does The Donald Drive You to Drink?

Featured image Well, no he doesn’t, but I don’t need an excuse for a drink. But the folks at The Nation magazine do. I’m on The Nation‘s email distribution list (so that you don’t have to), and the latest subscription bleg for their wine club opens as follows: Are you looking for that perfect Merlot to pair with Donald Trump’s immigration-policy proposals? A Sauvignon Blanc to help obscure Mike Huckabee’s tweets about »

Save the Planet: Eat Bacon

Featured image Anthony Watts of WattsUpWithThat tips us to an important new study on the greenhouse gas emissions impact of switching to a vegetarian-leaning diet. The study appears in the latest issue of Environmental Systems and Decisions, one of the many journals that thinks “systems analysis” is the key to understanding and saving the world. (Where is Robert McNamara when you really need him?) The complete study is  unfortunately behind a paywall, though »

Against “Unitaskers”

Featured image I’m gearing up over the next couple days to make a special video of Christmas book recommendations exclusively for Power Line VIP subscribers (another reason to sign up, besides the ad-free access!), but in the meantime, take in Alton Brown’s scathing review of “unitaskers”—those dumb kitchen items you only use for one purpose, like the strawberry slicer. (Though I have to admit, I do want a pair of kitchen claws, »

The Case for Meat

Featured image Have you heard the one about how you can tell someone is a vegan? Answer: Because they’ll f****** tell you. Sounds about right. Meanwhile: why should you eat meat? Don’t just answer with the obvious and self-evident truth: Because it really tastes great—especially grilled! Turns out eating meat may be essential for your mental health. From Women’s Health Magazine (just to show there’s no limit to Power Line’s efforts to »

Stories That Should Be True

Featured image Herewith a new category of Power Line post: stories that aren’t true, but ought to be, because they actually are, as Yogi Berra might say: World Health Organisation Warns That Consumption Of Kale Leads To Arrogance The World Health Organisation (WHO) has released a new report today warning that consumption of the ‘super-food’ kale over a period of time can lead consumers to have heightened levels of arrogance. The study was »

Oenophiles Can Stop Climate Whining

Featured image Two years ago in the estimable City Journal I wrote a short article about the stupidity of the climatistas worrying about how the world’s premier wine regions would be ruined by You Know What. Among other observations, I argued: Might a significantly warmer climate nonetheless make it too hot for grapes in some areas? Even if the climate models turn out to be generally correct (a bad bet at the »

Extra Bacon on My Hot Dog, Please!

Featured image If you were around the news yesterday, you heard the breathless news that processed meats significantly increase cancer risk, especially colon cancer. PBS initially reported that processed meats were as dangerous as smoking, but backed off under reader criticism. As they should have. Still, expect the usual censors to ratchet up their hectoring against the fondness for red meat that all red-blooded Americans share. You would think, from the media »