Race

A one-step approach to dealing with accusations of racism

Featured image Recently, the Washington Post published an article by Rebecca Hains called “Dear fellow white people: Here’s what to do when you’re called racist.” Hains is a professor of media and communication at Salem State University, where she also serves as a faculty fellow for diversity, power dynamics and social justice. Neither the article nor the statement of Hains’s credentials is a parody. Hains prescribed five steps her “fellow white people” »

The Growing Slavery Crisis

Featured image We wrote here about the New York Times’s “1619 project,” which attempts to sell the idea that America was founded on slavery, and that slavery is pretty much the only important thing that has ever happened here, even 154 years after its abolition. All with a view toward helping a Democrat win the presidency in 2020, I take it. Other press outlets have fallen into line, praising the Times and »

Do governments have a duty to reduce racial gaps?

Featured image John has demonstrated how the Washington Post lied about a statement Katherine Kersten made regarding racial discipline quotas in the St. Paul school system. The lie appears in an article by Rebecca Tan called “Racial gaps prove hard to reduce.” On the internet, the article is called “Local governments are trying to fix racial inequity. But the path forward isn’t clear.” John’s attack on Tan’s dishonest reporting is spot on. »

Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren lie about the Michael Brown case

Featured image Glenn Kessler writes a “fact check” column for the Washington Post. I find the column helpful because Kessler usually does a good job of stating what’s correct and what’s incorrect about the statements he’s checking. On the other hand, I think Kessler’s liberal bias comes into play when he applies his “Pinocchio Test.” It seems to me that he’s more inclined to award lots of Pinocchios to conservatives who have »

The poisonous lie of racist policing

Featured image It isn’t fun to keep addressing claims that policing in America is racist. But the left keeps peddling this lie, and Democratic presidential candidates have joined in, so I feel the need to keep countering it. Fortunately, Heather Mac Donald does the heavy lifting. I just have to link to her articles and do a little summarizing. Heather’s latest is called “Why ‘policing is racist’ is such a poisonous lie.” »

The Abyss of Liberal Ignorance

Featured image It is hard to judge the race between the presumptuousness and the abysmal ignorance of liberals. Back in the 1950s, for example, Arthur Schlesinger once included among leading conservative thinkers McGeorge Bundy, Wayne Morse, and Jacob Javits. Seriously?! (I can add my own vignette to these “Scenes from Inside the Liberal Bubble,” in the form of the UC Berkeley administrator who said to me once, “It would be great if »

The campaign to brand Trump a racist

Featured image The Washington Post’s latest attack piece on President Trump bears the infantile but revealing title: “The brand label that stokes Trump’s fury: ‘Racist, racist, racist.'” Philip Rucker and Ashley Parker begin the Post’s attack this way: President Trump considers himself a branding wizard, but he is vexed by a branding crisis of his own: how to shed the label of “racist.” As the campaign takes shape about 15 months before »

Mandatory Ethnic Studies Too Much Even for the LA Times

Featured image No one objects in principle to a serious ethnic studies program, just as sensible people support “multicultural” perspectives rightly understood. The trouble with a lot of multiculturalist projects and various identity-studies programs in schools today is that they are highly politicized and ideological. This attracts some students, but it understandably turns off many students—perhaps a large majority. Hence the demand of zealous advocates for ethnic studies to make their subject »

Today’s Comic Relief from the NY Times

Featured image The New York Times “Style” section has an advice column called “Social Qs” that I never read (the wedding announcements—or what Charles Murray calls the “mergers and acquisitions” page—is usually all the Times comedy I can take), but an alert reader pointed me to one of yesterday’s questions and answers, which is destined to be  classic: Did Dr. Seuss Lie to Our Kids? My 12-year-old daughter had a sticker on »

The shameless Mr. Sharpton

Featured image Democratic candidates for president have rallied around Al Sharpton, possibly the vilest man in American public life, in response to President Trump’s condemnation of him. Seth Mandel goes over the relevant ground in his Washington Post column “Al Sharpton is not a lifelong fighter for justice.” Jewish World Review has just posted Mandel’s column at the link and made it accessible to readers outside the Post’s circle of love. See »

Smearing Reagan, Again

Featured image Normally I don’t ever jump to the step-and-fetchit demands of our many lefty trolls, but I’ll make an exception for the story rocketing around right now that way back in 1971 Governor Reagan made a crude racist comment in a private conversation with (checks notes). . . Richard Nixon.  You can listen to the audio here (about the halfway mark). Here’s how Timothy Naftali (a nasty piece of work whom »

Bernie Sanders’s “racist” remarks about West Baltimore

Featured image Leading Democrats and their followers in the mainstream media are attacking President Trump for his comments about conditions in Rep. Elijah Cummings’s congressional district. Trump described the district as “a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” that “ranks last in almost every major category.” Democrats are saying — what else? — that these remarks are racist. I don’t think the U.S. President should bad mouth portions of America the way »

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Strikes Again

Featured image The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has issued a report on school discipline. The report claims that students of all races misbehave in school at the same rate. Black students are disciplined in school far more frequently than other students. Thus, the Civil Rights Commission wants us to believe not only that schools (mainly teachers) frequently discriminate against Black students, but that absent discrimination the rates of discipline would be »

“Racism”: It’s Not What It Used To Be

Featured image It sometimes seems that conservatives are accused of being “racist” any time they disagree with a black Democrat. The converse, of course, isn’t true. No one has ever called a Democrat a racist for disagreeing with, say, Thomas Sowell. It turns out that, crazy as it may seem, there are a great many Americans who think it is racist to disagree with a black politician (assuming that he or she »

(Don’t) leave it to Cleaver

Featured image Roll Call has a good account of what happened on the House floor yesterday as Nancy Pelosi violated House rules for the all-important purpose of calling President Trump racist. FOX News has a fuller story here. When Rep. Doug Collins challenged the propriety of Pelosi’s remarks, Pelosi asserted that she had cleared them with the House parliamentarian. This appears to have been a lie. Roll Call reports: Collins set off »

Buttigieg’s pander: a Marshall Plan for black America

Featured image Pete Buttigieg soared from obscurity to third place (at one time) in the Democratic race for the presidency. His candidacy struck me as interesting for about a week. Then, I realized that he’s just another left-wing Democrat, distinguished from the rest of the field primarily because he happens to be gay. And he has fallen back in the polls. Even at its peak, the Buttigieg campaign faced a huge problem »

Joe Biden: “Let’s talk about the future”

Featured image Joe Biden, having finally apologized, ridiculously, for his remarks about working with segregationists in the 1970s, is imploring his Democratic rivals to “talk about the future instead of the past.” But talk about the past is usually more probative than talk about the future when it comes to selecting a president. Candidates who talk about the future can promise the moon. Talking about the past provides a good indication of »